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47

RACING the Blue Train threatened to become an epidemic amongst sporting , motorists seeking new stunts in France some time ago.

The craze of beating the railways has now, apparently, spread to New Zealand, for news is to hand of the’ exploit of a driver of a Rover ” Ten” saloon whereby he has set up a record run from Wellington to Auckland. Starting at the same time as the Limited night express he covered the distance of 300 miles at such a high average speed that he reached Auckland thirty minutes before the train ; this, in spite of the fact that the route lay over a mountainous course and bad roads.

A Change of Title.

AFTER. 34 years’ use the name of the “Triumph Cycle Co., Ltd.” was changed to the “Triumph Company Ltd.” at the Annual General Meeting in Coventry recently. This step was decided upon in view of the ever widening interests of this world-famous concern, and particularly its expansion in the field of motorcar manufacture. The Chairman, Lord. Leigh, said that not so very long ago a motor-cycle was still the pride of the well-to-do sportsman. To-day it had yielded that place largely to the motorcar, but there was still a great

future for a perfect motor-cycle at a moderate price.

The Government and Record Attempts. (;.)vermucl,

THE attitude of the (;.)vermucl, towards record-breaking attipts was mentioned by ),I r. V. H. i I ()le , M a naging Director of New Hudson, Ltd., in his speech to the shareholders some time ago.

Mr. Mole said that whilst it was unlikely that his own company would ever want the use of the roads for record-breaking purposes, it seemed amazing that it should be necessary for any record attempts to be made abroad. The breaking of records enhanced British prestige and consequently, sales of motorcycles Overseas.

If a German manufacturer wanted to go for records, continued Mr. Mole, his Government closed the roads for him and gave him all the police and soldiers he wanted to organise the event. Vet our own Government, although it saw fit to subsidize Grand Opera, which would not be exported, put these obstacles in the way of the motorcycle industry improving its reputation, and hence its export trade.

Horse-Shoes for Luck. with a horse-shoe

ACAR with a horse-shoe firmly wedged in the windscreen was driven for days before the owner even troubled to remove his ” lucky ” souvenir. The shoe was flung on its edge straight into the middle of the screen, but so strong was the Triplex safety glass of which the screen was made that except where it was actually struck it remained

almost undamaged.

The horse-shoe in this case did not bring luck to the owner of the car, but its presence in the windscreen was eloquent testimony to an extremely lucky escape.

Glasgow’s Flying Squad.

FOLLOW IN G the 4: ti _ ample set by the Sheffield Police and Scotland Yard, the Glasgow Police Force has now purchased Al v is cars for its flying squad. The models selected are six-cylinder” Silver Eagles,” fitted with

h triple carburettors and capable of from 80 to 90 miles per hour.

T h e Northampton, Rochdale, Durham and Wigan Police Forces have also chosen these ears for their mobile squads.