BLUE-BIRD COMPLETED.

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BLUE-BIRD COMPLETED.

MESSRS. Gurney Nutting are to be congratulated on their success in building the latest body on Sir Malcolm Campbell’s car The Rolls-Royce power unit now fitted is much bigger than the Napier, but the panelling has been carried smoothly round and between the two blocks, which produces an effect not unlike the cowling of the Supermarine Schneider Trophy seaplane in which the engine first appeared. The radiator cowling is no longer independent of the body, but joins it at the top, and then sweeps down following the general line of the body. The engine is enclosed under a separate bonnet, tapering and enclosed at the forward end, so that the air from

the radiator escapes between the front end of the bonnet and the radiator casing. The clean sweep of the radiator cowl is broken by a square pipe projecting forward. This is the supercharger intake, and its forward position is necessary to take advantage of the extra pressure built by the forward motion of the car, which amounts to about 2 lbs. at full speed. Sir Malcolm is rather pleased to have the pipe high up, even though it does detract slightly from the car’s appearance, since it avoids any chance of sand or water getting drawn into the supercharger. The smooth and glossy panels are unbroken except for six plated exhaust stubs

on each side of the bonnet, and the fore and aft link which controls each front wheel. The rear of the car with its stabilising fin off-set behind the driver’s seat, is unchanged from last year.

The cockpit is dominated by the large Smith rev, counter reading up to 3,500 r.p.m. The dial is divided off in the familiar way with sectors of various colours, while round the rim are marked the magic figures ” 230 ” ” -240 ” and so on up to “300.” The dash carries the usual gauges for petrol, oil pressure, water temperature, and supercharger pressurei and an unusual one in the shape of a thermometer giving the back axle temperature.