IS ROAD RACING WORTH WHILE?

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EDITORIAL. IS ROAD RACING WORTH WHILE?

NEVER has public interest in motor-racing been so widespread in Great Britain as it is to-day. The situation was aptly expressed by ” The Times ” in their recent description of the proposed roadcircuit at Ivinghoe. ” Interest in motor racing has in creased in England in recent years, yet the laws of the land have so far never permitted the holding of road races such as have been common on the Continent. Parliamentary Permission may perhaps be gained for such a race, but it is well that outside interests should establish a racing course on private ground over the full circuit of which

road conditions are maintained.” There are three such courses in view. First, there comes the proposed Ivinghoe circuit, of which full particulars have now been made public, and a description of which appears in this issue of MOTOR SPORT. Secondly, there is the project for the construction of a course in the grounds of Gopsall Park, in Leicester shire, but so far no plans its apathy towards motor racing a few years ago, has to wholehearted of the sport, and very real service nor details of the site or proposed circuit have reached us. Finally, there

s. is the much shorter (but on the other hand already con structed) road-course at Donnington Park, some notes on which appear on

another page. All this enterprise on the part of the promoters of the three schemes mentioned above is worthy of every encouragement by those who profess to have the future of motor-racing at h. eart. The daily press, from

in educating the public mind in the furtherance of motorracing. This has been strikingly illustrated by the enthusiastic reception of the Ivinghoe scheme by the London evening and morning newspapers, and all the provincial dailies.

In view of this, we find the attitude of a certain motoring contemporary, towards these proposed new circuits very difficult to understand. Their chef objection seems to be doubt as to whether motor-racing can be made a financial success. With this we do not agree. We can only point to the examples of France, Ger many and Italy, where the finest drivers earn anything up to £8,000 per annum in prize money, apart from bonuses, where crowds of 100,000 are commonplace, and where there is a road race of some sort practically every week end during the season. Motor racing, judged by these standards, is practically non-existent in England to-day. Is it worth while trying to bring about the Continental popu country, or are we to shake Continent, our attitude to wards the promotion of

these new road-circuits in. England can only be one of

fervent encouragement. larity of road racing in this our heads in gloomy pro

phesy of ruin to all who try ?

Let us make no mistake. In these -three projects for the construction of a circuit in England, motor-racing is being put to the test as to whether it is ever to become the national sport it has

been for years abroad. If we, as Englishmen, sin cerely desire that our coun try should be placed at last on a level footing with our rivals on the

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