THE SCHOOLBOY'S PARADISE

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THE SCHOOLBOY’S PARADISE

MANY WELL KNOWN RACING CARS AT THE WHITE CITY. MOTOR RACING FILMS AND MANY OTHER EXHIBITS.

NO one ever loses entirely the enthusiasms of one’s boyhood. Rather may it be said that most hobbies are but the actual carrying out of the aspirations of our younger days. The only difference between the crowds of schoolboys who eagerly examined the group of racing cars at the Schoolboys’ Own Exhibition, and the owners and drivers of those cars, is that the latter can put into practice the dreams and hopes of the former.

And a very representative show of cars it was too. Earl Howe’s Bugatti, Whitney Straight’s Maserati, Raymond Mays’s Riley, Kaye Don’s 4.9 Bugatti, Oliver Bertram’s :pelage, Videngren’s Amilcar.

Tomm y Wisd(nn’s Leyland Thomas, and E. R. Hall’s M.G. Magnette. Added to this the B.R.D.C. showed a specimen pit, fully equipped for a long race with all the gadgets required by the pundits. Motor racing formed quite a large part of the exhibition, for a most interesting film-show was given two or three times daily. Its most interesting feature was that historical relic of the pre-War Grand Prix races.. A running commentary was given by E. R. Hall and Dudley Froy, and on one occasion R. A. Nockolds, the motoring artist, assisted by his brother gave an imitation of racing car exhaust iv■tes at Brooklands, Shelsley and else

where. Incidentally, there was a small gallery of Nockold’s pictures alongside the actual cars.

Another fine film was called “War in the Air,” and showed War-time aicraft in action. Of the exhibits, the BassetLowke Underground model was perfect, and the small scale steam locomotives (complete with that heavy panting of express trains and the sprinkling of redhot ashes underneath) were marvellously realistic.

All tastes were catered for, from stampcollecting to engineering, and boys of all ages found plenty to interest them in a show which has now become a regular annual event.