ROAD RACING IN ENGLAND

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ROAD RACING IN ENGLAND

IN view of the greatly increased enthusiasm for motor-racing which is sweeping the motoring public of Europe, it is comforting to remember that plans are still progressing for the construction of a genuine road racing circuit in England.

At present Donington Park is, of course, the only venue available. With the improvements outlined in the last issue of MOTOR SPORT, it will be possible to run much more ambitious races than last year, and it is interesting to note that a fixture has been booked on the International Calendar for October 6th. Even with the straightening of the course to give a one mile stretch, I onington is still rather too twisty for a race for Grand Prix cars, but in the absence of another circuit, we welcome the enterprise of the Derby Motor Club in bringing their course Into the finest passible condition.

The proposed circuits at Ivinghoe and Copsall Park have not yet materialised. Copsall has booked a date on the Calendar, and we are informed that preliminary work is still being carried out by the promoters of both these circuits.

The proposed Brighton circuit has received a great deal of publicity lately in the i ally Press, unfortunately most of it dealing with the objections raised by local residents and societies—notably the Sussex I ownsmen.

However, Mr. Laurence Clayton, the prime mover in the affair, has not been daunted by this shower of protests which have rained on him for several weeks. As already reported in MOTOR SPORT, he has secured the permission of the Brighton Corporation to take a lease of 400 acres of downland near Portslade.

The Portslade Urban 1 istrict Council is now awaiting full plans and specifications from the promoters, and these will be duly considered by the ‘I own Planning Committee, under whose jurisdiction the district lies. In point of actual, unbiassed fact, there has seldom been a plan for a racecourse of any kind less likely to offend the eye of the most sensitively minded aesthete. The road itself will be macadamised, and therefore no more hideous than the thousands of first and secondclass public roads which already are taken for granted. The only permanent building will be a club-house built in the style of a Sussex tithe-barn—not, be it noted, in the glorious architecture of the

Peacehaven abortions which have swallowed up the downs at the other end of Brighton. As will be seen from the plan of the proposed circuit reproduced on this page, two circuits are allowed for, the longer of the two measuring ft miles. The ground is by no means level, so that the course will be a real test of competing cars. The maximum gradient is 1 in 14, and the variety of corners should delight the most ardent specialist in this branch of racing technique. 1 he grandstand will be a temporary construction, which can

be demolished quickly at the end of the season, and the same principle will be applied to the pits, tuning sheds, and paddock buildings.

‘I he downs themselves, with slopes running down to the road, will provide ample accommodation at a low charge for thousands of spectators, and splendid vantage points will be available all round the circuit. The road itself, by the way, will be 30 feet in width. It is the intention of the promoters to

float a public company with a capital of £150,000, and construction will be commenced as soon as this has been done. It is hoped to complete the track towards the end of the summer.

With these three courses, Brighton. Ivinghoe and Gopsall, all being developed by their respective sponsors, it does seem that there is reason to hope that England will shortly be on more or less equal terms with other countries in the provision of a Grand Prix racing course.

We wish all concerned the very best of luck in their efforts.

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