A LIVELY MCC MEETING

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44

A LIVELY M.C.C. MEETING

THE annual general meeting of the M.C.C. is amongst the better free entertainments. This year it was held at Pagani’s on Saturday evening, January 29th, and some valuable as well as amusing views were aired. Many famous persons attended, including the M.G. team drivers, and L. A. Baddeley was in the chair with Capt. J. H. Wylie, Captain„ on his right and ” Jackie ” Masters, Secretary, on his left. The chairman pointed out that if this year’s trials were run as last year, a loss

of some 050 would result. Parking charges in Exeter, etc., for competitors’ cars were considerable and horses and towing charges totalled about 000. Complaints were being made about trials from which the M.C.C. is fortunately immune, probably because of this careful organisation. The account was carried and Messrs. Baddeley, Wylie and Masters re-elected. Much discussion followed as to whether the meeting served any good purpose as the Committee did not guarantee to act as the voting dictated. Mr. Baddeley differentiated between ” resolutions ” and “motions” ” and Mr. Prail, who raised the issue, asked if the M.C.C. was a democratic body. He proposed to take action if the Committee did not act as

it promised. Mr. Prail suggested that cars need horses and tractors and it was right and proper to charge car members more than motor-cycle members. More sporting trials might reduce costs and Toulmin offered to contribute a landslide in Buxton. R. J. Low said one-time motorcycle owners with means now run M.G. Midgets. After cries of “Advert.” he amended this to 750 c.c. fourwheelers. The Club’s present resources had been built up by motor-cycle membership. Car folk do not like rough sections and road repairs absorb money. There were dozens of fresh hills in Devon. The chairman replied that severe hills cannot be cleared in big trials and all new hills had been inspected and turned down for that reason. Observers cannot do longer periods and his club reluctantly has to refrain from using severe sections. He said existing entry fees would probably continue and urged members to leave the matter to their Committee. They did not want to cheapen awards. Mr. Low wanted separate accounts for each event but was reminded of the cost and told that members can always apply for this information. The composition of the M.C.C.asa company was queried and

the chairman explained that members own a share that costs them nothing but a dividend is ‘payable on winding up. (Cries of ” Could we wind up ? “) Mr. Low persisted for separate accounts. It was pointed out that he never attends events and appears to come to obstruct and he should be bought out (laughter and. claps). The chairman said separate net accounts would be published in future. Mr. Low asked for money in place of awards as he had often wondered how much gold there was in a gold medal. He suggested certificates and prizes as credited entry fees in next M.C.C. event. J. A. Harrison said as a teetotaller he had no use for tankards and Mr. Masters had agreed to carry over his awards as future subscriptions. Mr. Low thought it disgraceful that no member knew of Mr. Harrison’s arrangement. Mr. Masters replied that he had yet to answer Mr.

Harrison’s letter. There was a clause in the rules permitting members a choice of prizes and Harrison liked Revelation suitcases. Someone suggested” running a book.” Mr. Low said the Club had no legal right to hold motor-car contests and quoted a company which worded its associations equally unsuccessfully, and the C.T.C., as also ” coming unstuck.” (Cries of ” Clink “) A motor-cycle member said car folk were welcome and good fellows. The chairman had taken solicitor’s advice and thought the Club was covered. Mr. Low, after it was suggested he should pay the expenses of a legal investigation, asked if members realised the seriousness of the situation. The chairman said he disliked council’s opinion but would take further solicitor’s advice. The general discussion followed. Mr. Frail asked for a second motor-cycle Hour Trial at Brooklands and Mr. Masters said motor-cyclists would not enter a morning event and had the best period of the afternoon. Cutting car races would not save the necessary time and no more vehicles could be allowed on the track together. The Committee would go into this matter. Harrison asked for a better road for the final tests in the Torquay Rally. The chairman said they used the only possible road. Torquay was an ideal venue. (Cry of “Yes, I have a dame there I “) Mr. Pidgeon asked why the Buxton entry fee was cheaper than that of the lon).:,,–distance trials. Did night sections cost 15/-extra ? (Cry of ” You’ve been kept in the dark! “) The chairman replied that longer events cost more anti awards vary. The question of a motorcycle team trial was raised, but the M.C.C. cannot get the A.C.U. to agree with their views. it was suggested that London entrants get late numbers in the big trials. The chairman said a fair ballot was taken, which led Mr. Frail to ask if more ink was used in writing ” London” and someone else to enquire if the thinnest paper obtainable was used for the other names. A ” Five Premier ” Trophy to replace the Triple Award was suggested, but the ” Triple ‘ was favoured. Maurice Toulinin asked that pressure be brought to bear on the R.A.C. and A.C.U. in respect of checking the conduct of trials organisers, in view of increasing complaints. Small clubs might be afraid to act in case of suffering a hit back. Tile chairman said the R.A.C. had appointed a committee of three. Action was being taken over the attempt to close Jenkins Chapel. Sunday events might be reduced, but motor-cyclists are usually confined to Sundays. Harrison suggested downhill tests to replace hills, but avoiding a gymkhana aspect. Mr. Low thought the Saturday general meeting had met with poor response and someone said members must have read his motions (laughter). Toultnin wanted a supper afterwards and it was suggested the motor-cycle members buy it if their cheap sub scriptions continue. The supper was favourably discussed. Standard tyres and night sections were discussed but not disposed of. Tales of competitors waking by alarum-clock after long waits outside checks were alleged. The chairman said the Press says a lot that doesn’t happen. [Will he please clear the motoring Press ?] Frail wanted the check outside Exeter moved to reduce the noise nuisance, an idea enlarged upon by Toulmin. Chaplin asked why the Exeter could not start on Boxing Day but as he did not stand up he was unanswered. Rhyll Hill was alleged to have a cross

road in an observed section. Asked whether night sections were welcomed as pitting tired drivers against easy hills, the chairman replied It helps.” He agreed to spend less money on Simms hill.