THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

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THE SHAPE OF THINGS TO COME

WE were reminded by the debate which followed Laurence Pomeroy’s address at the recent 750 Club meeting that there is much to discuss and decide appertaining to the future of the Sport. If Pomeroy’s plan to attract new recruits to motor racing by way of one-design cars is to come about a manufacturer must be persuaded to experiment with suitable designs and a body must be formed. to sell the cars and stage the contests. If Class I is to come to anything, those who hope to be at the helm of club secretaryship after the war must tell us whether or not they are willing to support the project, so that those keen to construct 500-c.c. sprint cars can formulate their plans. It is equally desirable that some consideration be given to the sort of events the clubs will put over when peace returns, down to detail discussion as to suitable venues, etc. R. D. Caesar proposes a new company for the purpose of manufacturing an honest British sports car and has already received support for his scheme ; let experienced enthusiasts indicate the lines this ” ideal ” car should follow, if it is to prove sufficiently successful to be commercially practical. Incidentally another group

of enthusiasts is interested in the same sort of project, and a 2-litre V8 design is spoken of in this case. Let those who have regularly supported races, rallies and trials in the past tell the R.A.C., the J.C.C. and the B.A.R.C. what they expect of organising bodies when the and ruiining rapid motor-cars. Will those who are given Spitfires to fly to-day be given British Grand Prix cars to race in International contests in the New Europe, or will war has ended in Victory. It is time, too, for the Government at least to hint at the sort of reception that young men now doing dangerous jobs in the Services are likely to experience when they celebrate the Armistice by buying

motor racing continue to be regarded as a curious, isolated and virtually unwanted sport by the Press and the public of this democratic isle ? Will the science of motoring be encouraged by reduction in car taxation and the abolition of unnecessarily restrictive laws, or will it remain as something foreign amongst ordinary healthy pursuits ? Up to now, about the only writer outside the Motoring Press who accepts motoring science as a normal interest of modern young men and women is a former director of the Gyntecological Clinic of Haarlem, specialising in sex problems. . .

Although the war may not be over this year, or even by 1943, now is the time to consider what forms post-war motoring sport should take. It will have to assist a lame Motor Industry to regain its former stride, just as happened in 1918-25, when, incidentally, the British Sunbeam was no mean factor in G.P. racing. Certain makers of utility cars have told us something of their future programmes and we would like to see sports car manufacturers take a page out of Gordon Sutherland’s book, and follow suit. It is so easy to be too late. We have had quite sufficient warning of the results of procrastination in the present lamentable international situation. By the very nature of things motor-racing supporters are accustomed to making quick and vital decisions as well as being constantly engaged in developing their own ideas and resources. Now is the time for them to apply those qualities to the direction of their particular Sport in the days to come, and a scheme worked out now which could be put into operation immediately hostilities cease would be invaluable both to corn

motoring and to the welfare of the Motor Industry as a whole. We can promise the help of this journal in any practical proposals.