LETTERS from READEARS

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Sir, May I say that although I take in all available motoring journals, I have never before come across one which breathes the spirit of enthusiasm and keenness as does MOTOR Siam’, or keeps interest alive

so well in these difficult motorless times. Long may it flourish. I have a Riley Nine ” Kestrel ” which, after twelve months’ spare time work, I have to my liking. It has a “Special Series” engine, so should be pretty good ; it breaks my heart to see it stand there

and deteriorate for lack of use. I am now keen to get hold of a 1937 or 1938 M.G. T-Midget, to play around with until the great day. With regard to the “vintage versus modern” argument now raging, although not biased either way, it seems to me, purely from my own experiences with different makes, that modern cars gene rally are easier to drive, and are definitely ” livelier ” to the touch, probably due to lighter weight and combined body and chassis construction. But they are not made to last as were good cars of ten or fifteen years ago ; anyway, why should they ? The average motorist usually desires a change every twelve months or so. I have owned and driven many popular makes of car since 1929, including Jowett, Morris Eights, Cowleys, Standard Nine and Ten, Austin Sevens, Riley Nines, Singer Bantam, Citroen Twelve and

Eighteen, Lloyd, Ford Eights and Tens, Hillman Minx, S.S.1, M.G. L-type, etc., and many motor-cycles. No car gave me as much pleasure as a 1929 2-seater Riley Nine, with a 1936 Singer Bantam a close second. I always think Singers should get more of the limelight, the performance is really lively even

in saloon form, but springing is rather a weak point, rear springs are prone to fracture with four up on a bad road, and the front shockers do not seem up to their job. These cars are economical, too ; oil consumption was still 1,000 m.p.g. after 52,000-odd miles, and she would still do 40 m.p.g. petrol.

Like many others, I live only for the day, which we hope is not far distant, when we can join a club and “dice” and scramble to our hearts’ content, in good company.

Rednal. I am, Yours, etc.,

W. BEVAN.