Obituary

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Cotton Henning
We regret to report that news has reached us from America, via Charles Lytle, that, following the demise of Hepburn and Horn, another racing driver, Cotton Henning, died last December. At Indianapolis, where Henning was known as “Mr. Racing,” he operated the Boyle stable for many years, cars from this organisation winning the 500-Mile Race in 1934, 1939 and 1940. Henning made many visits to Europe and, back home at Indianapolis, maintained a place in his garage for anyone in need of help, supplying parts and assistance, material and intangible alike, to team-mate or rival with complete impartiality. American racing will not be the same this year without Hepburn, Horn and Henning.

F. G. Craner
It seems almost impossible to accept that the red-faced, bluff Fred Craner is no longer with us; he died, at 53, following an operation. Craner was responsible for Donington and, at the time of his death, was doing all he could to get that fine circuit back. He brought the German teams to this country in 1937 and 1938, but long before that he raced motor-cycles, tested Rolls-Royce cars and aero-engines and looked after clubmen in the early days of the Derby and D.M.C.’s new road circuit. He also ran two garages, so he packed plenty into the daily grind. His loss is an irreplaceable one, and makes the future of Donington more bleak than ever.

Mre. Grenfell
We extend deep sympathy to Jack Grenfell in the loss of his wife, Minnie Grenfell, formerly Minnie Tully, who rode 90-bore B.A.T.-J.A.P.s, Matchlesses and Indians with the best of the motorcyclists of those days. She remained a keen motor-cyclist all her life, assisted her husband at his Brooklands workshop and mothered all the lady riders who ventured on the Track. Her many friends have suffered a very great loss.

C. W. Markham
The motor-cycle world has suffered another great loss in the fatal accident to C. W. Markham, the modest roadtester for Motor Cycling.

Louis Mantell
We regret to learn that Louis Mantel died on January 2nd, at the age of 68. He was well known as a carburation expert and was with Solex Ltd. for many years. He contributed a technical feature to the Light Car regularly each week, written in an entertaining style, frequently championing such matters as one carburetter per cylinder on racing engines (which inspired A. F. Ashby’s racing Riley Nine experiments), Mitchell bearings, rotary valves, and so forth. I well recall how one summer holiday was enlivened for me by the arrival of the Light Car after I had induced Mantell to enlarge on the pros and cons of using a supercharger to blow air through the carburetter, as distinct from placing it between carburetter and engine. — W. B.

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