Club news, February 1952

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We hear Jarvis & Sons, of Wimbledon, have a new telephone number—Liberty 8221.

Congratulations to Robert Baird on the birth of his second son. Baird hopes to drive Ferraris again this season and is negotiating for a four-cylinder Formula II car and may also procure one of the new 2.5-litre sports Ferraris.

A reader in Durham is rebuilding a 1925 Newton-Ceirano and G Stapleton, like Ted Pool, is running a 1925 “8.3” Renault.

The remains of a Fiat, thought to be an Edwardian of modest hp lie in a yard at Barrow-in-Furness and might be useful as spares.

Eric Manby has built himself an impressive special, consisting of a Bedford JCV 10-12 cwt chassis, with a Vauxhall J-type 4.7 to 1 back axle and the saloon body from a 1948 11/2-litre Jaguar. The steering arm came from a 3-ton Bedford (it was cranked to suit), the seats from a Sunbeam-Talbot, the front wings from a Vauxhall Velox, and the specification includes a Servais silencer, Fram oil filter, Ford V8 horn grilles, Hillman Minx screen wipers and a Rover “75” front bumper. The radiator is from a 1938 21/2-litre Jaguar and Lockheed brakes are used. Photographs prove that the appearance is quite up to modern production-car standards. Good show !

RG Davies, 14, Lyttleton Street, Barbourne, Worcester, seeks advice about 1924-30 V-twin Blackburn engines as used in Morgans, as he has two of these and wants to rebuild one of them.

JH Nunn runs an “1,100” Fiat dh coupe which averaged 403/4 mpg for 1,590 miles during the last Daily Express Rally. He uses the 11/42 final drive in place of the usual 9/42 and used two gallons of 80-octane and 37 gallons of Pool. Normally the Fiat is run supercharged, using an Italmeccanica Roots blower, when the consumtion is 50 mpg at 40 mph. This is with the standard Zenith carburetter with 22-mm choke and 100 main jet. Fellow Fiatists may copy !

At Southend an AC Sociable has been unearthed in a field and is to be restored, while someone else is busy restoring a 1914 Swift cyclecar. Then Chris Shorrock finds he must get rid of his 1926 “23/65” sleeve-valve Peugeot Victor Broome saloon. This car has been in Shorrock’s family since new, has covered only about 16,000 miles, starts easily, and is probably the only Peugeot of this type in England. He seeks a good home for it. Letters will be forwarded.

Minimodels are thinking of introducing a toy 41/2-litre Ferrari. John Vessey is restoring a 1911 two-cylinder Renault. A 1922 11.9 Standard two-seater was amongst the cars serviced by Kennings, Ltd., of Peterborough. during a recent Standard and Triumph service week.

Knight still has his short-chassis racing Brescia Bugatti and is building a special comprising a Speed Twenty Alvis engine in a lowered Silver Eagle Alvis chassis, with 1/4-elliptic back springs having radius-rods above them, Alvis front axle and gearbox and Jeep radiator block. Some years ago Lamb’s Ltd., of South Woodford, presented a 1906 30-hp Standard two-seater to the SW Essex Teehnical College Museum. It was brought, out recently to convey a party of clowns to the King George V Hospital, where they performed before children and patients. It is a pity when old cars fulfil funny roles, but in this instance the Standard performed a good service. Housewife last November included a very fine drawing by Martin Aitchison, of a vintage “Chummy” Austin Seven with one of its stories. A 1923 200-Mile race twin ohc Newton racer languishes in a Manchester cellar, while a 1928 6.4-hp Peugeot 2/4-seater, which the American Army had been using as transport in search of alcoholic sustenance, was saved by an antique dealer and was for sale in Surrey last month.

HD Spirey got a long story about his “old crocks” in the Scunthorpe Telegraph recently, when he parted with his 1911 GWK to ID Lee, whose firm made the original Coventry Simplex engine. The GWK went from Crowle to Coventry faster than the train in spite of breakfast and lunch stops, and averaged 42 mpg. Mr. Spiney’s other old cars include a 1911 Rollo eyelecar, a 1923 Fiat and a 1924 37-hp Daimler shooting-brake. Arising out of a letter in last month’s issue, SJ Digby remarks that he is restoring a 1914 7-hp Perry. The original owner, a clergyman now nearly 90 years of age, has been promised a ride when the work is completed.

We are glad to learn that the News of the World is again backing the Ulster Trophy Race on June 7th.

Victor Axel Berg has replaced his 100 mph 41/2-litre Invicta with the fabric-bodied two-seater “30/98” Vauxhall raced at Brooklands before the war by Clive Windsor Richards. The NWLMC hopes to receive an invitation to a tough trial in the Swiss Alps about the time of this year’s Alpine Rally.

The club has informal monthly evening meetings at “The Phoenix,” Hartley Wintney, Hampshire, on the first Thursday in the month ; at the “White Lion,” Cobham, Surrey, on the third Thursday ; and at, the “Jolly Farmer,” Enfield, on the last ‘Thursday ; while the Midland Section meets on the second Thursday at the “Red Lion,” Church Street, Birmingham, and the Northern Section at “The Crescent,” Ilkley, on the last Thursday.

A very big edition of the club’s inimitable “Bulletin,” edited by Ronald Barker, appeared at Christmas, and four issues will be published this year, the first due next month–they are not to be missed !

The club caters primarily for pre-1931 cars, the annual subscription is 25s, and details are obtainable front TW Carson. Mellalut, Pack Lane, Kempshott, Basingstoke, Hampshire.

John Heath, of HWM has honoured the Citroen Car Club by becoming its President. A dinner and dance has been arranged as celebration of this event in honour of the president and will take place on February 29th, at the Berkeley Rooms, Zeeta house, Putney High Street, SW. Tickets are now available, at 21s each, and as numbers will be restricted, members are advised to make application to John B Layton, Hon Sec CCC, 103, Kingston Inn, Surrey, as soon as possible. During the evening the Kendall Trophy and other awards for 1951 won by members will be presented, followed by dancing until 12.30 am. The CCC has now over 390 members and at the present time is rapidly expanding. Many interesting events and social gatherings have already been arranged for 1952.

“Bluebird” hot-rod ? According to a Wembley newspaper American car racing promoter Captain RT Crise, is sure that the late Sir Malcolm Campbell’s car ‘Bluebird,’ now owned by the local car dealer, Simpson Brothers, 345. High Road, Wembley, can beat the world land speed record.

“The machine was shipped over to America on the ‘American Harvester’ in November at Captain Crise’s request, and was exhibited at the International Motor Show in Washington before it went on a dollar-earning tour of the USA.

“Mr John and Mr James Simpson flew over to Washington to be present at this show, and it was then that Captain Crise told them of his views about the car’s possibilities. The Wembley car dealers agreed to an attempt being made on the existing speed record of 354 mph, held by John Cobb’s Rallton, and plans were laid for a new engine design. Mr. Frank Beiroy proprietor of Speed Parts Incorporated and one of America’s leading engine designers, had much to do with this aspect of the project.

“Plans have now been completed and it is expected that an attempt will be made at the Utah Salt Flats late this summer. Not only will the engine have to be replaced by a more powerful one but some adaptions will have to be made to the bodywork. The designers are confident that the “Bluebird” will be able to travel at 450 mph.”

“The main difficulty will be in stopping the machine. The Utah Flats are only 14 miles long and half this distance will be covered as the car gathers speed for the timed mile. It is possible that rockets will be fitted in reverse at the front and these will be used as a brake after the car has completed the mile flat-out.”

“Still touring the USA ‘Bluebird’ is at present in New Jersey.

“Two things have yet to be decided—which firm is to build th engine, and who is to drive the car in the attempt to break the record. Mr Delroy and Captain Crise are considering coming over to England in 1953 to promote American style car racing in this country, and perhaps to establish some track’s.”

Presumably by American-style car racing dirt-track is implied, for even an American would find it difficult to re-open Brooklands or Donington or build new full-size tracks.

New World’s records confirmed

‘Five world’s records establislied by Ab Jenkins, driving his 253/4-litre Mormon Meteor at Utah last July have been confirmed. They are : 50 kilometres, 179.8 mph. 50 miles, 185.6 mph. 100 kilometres, 187.7 mph. 100 miles, 190.7 mph. 200 kms, 191.6 mph.

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