BOOK REVIEW

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“‘Motor Sport’ Racing Car Review-I956,” by Denis Jenkinson. 123 pp., 5 in. by 71 in. ((;renville Publishing Co., Ltd., 15-17, City Road, London, E.C.I. 8s. 6d.)

This fascinating and informative little volume, now in its ninth year, describes in text and picture the Formula I G.P. racing cars of last season, and who better fitted for the task than the author, who, As M.OTOR SPOnT’s Continental COrITZTOMICIA, follows the G.P. ” circus ” round Europe throughout the summer.

This year’s edition has better photographs than ever before, all taken by MOTOR SPORT staff photographers. which means a full-page view of each 1955 F. I car and ennally large, pictures of the more interesting technical features, such as suspension, disc brakes, cockpit layout, etc.

In view of Britain’s present interest in Grand Prix racing, it is especially interesting to read Jenkinson’s opinions of B.R.M., Con’ nought and Vanwall, and to compare the achievements of these with those of Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, Lancia, Nlaserati and Gordini, etc. Of B.R.M., the author writes : ” . . handled properly, the R.R.M. would appear to have great prospects before them,” but he makes a plea for the cars to tackle true G.P. racing and not confine themselves to club meetings on Eoglish aerodrome circuits-A few laps round a flat, smooth perimeter track may convince the populace but Internationally, where Formula I really counts, it means little.” He is warm in his praise of Connaught’s Syracuse victory, describing it as •• no fluke, nor was it against negligible opposition, nor failure of the opposition . . . the first convincing British Grand Prix win since the beginning of Motor racing . . .” Jenkinson is obviously not too pleased Ns id) Vans, all, finding retirements due not to Serious engine troultle hut to the breakage of minor parts which ” should have been Sorted out during 1954.” This hook brings limite new facts and doesn’t mince its opinions. Hawthorn is commended 14 leaving Vanwall for Ferrari beeause ” the best driver cannot cope with a troublesome car.” hut Seim)) is praised for putting new life into In’ Vanwall team ” usually considered the life and soul of a cocktail party, he most certainly was the life and soul of the Vanwall team at Aintree.” We discover that Connaught despaired of ever getting the S. (5. fuel-injection system to function properly and that at Syracuse they used Homlaille shock-absorbers, ” . . despairing of ever finding an English shockabsorber to satisfy their needs, just as they had ehanged to Italian carburetters.” (They also used Pirelli tyres at Syracuse.-En.)

This landscape book covers not only W196 and Formule Libre Mercedes-Benz, F. I and Mk. II HEM., Types 625 and 555 Ferrari, Connaught, Vanwall, 250/FI Maserati, sixand eight-cylinder Gordinis, F. I Lancia, but Cooper-Bristol, Arzani-Volpini and D.B. F. I cars. The foreword is by W. Boddy, Editor of MOTOR SPORT.

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