B.R.M. V8 Stretched to 2-Litres

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

The Owen Organisation has developed a 2-litre version of its 1 1/2-litre Formula One engine for use in sports cars. Based on all the main castings from the existing Grand Prix engine, the 2-litre (or 1,880 c.c. to be precise) version weighs 264 lb., and is the same length as the 1 1/2-litre engine. The width is only 0.2 of an inch larger than the Grand Prix engine, and the height has been increased by only 0.7 of an inch. A recent test of the new unit gave power outputs of 240 b.h.p. at 9,500 r.p.m., with a slight tail-off to 10,000 r.p.m. One of the main points of this new venture from Bourne is the engine’s torque figures. These start at about 115 ft./lb. at 5,000 r.p.m. and gradually increase to a maximum of about 140 ft./lb. at 7,000 and 8,000 r.p.m., to gradually slide down to 125 ft./lb. at 10,000 r.p.m. The makers claim that further development will be carried out if there is sufficient interest in the engine to produce torque figures in the region of 145 ft./lb. and power in excess of 250 b.h.p.

The engine should be particularly welcome in sports-car events, where there is a sad lack of really interesting 2-litre engines, and will undoubtedly find a market in the small sports and G.T. classes as well as being a possible for the European Hill-Climb Championship. One cannot but wonder what the outcome would have been had B.R.M. managed to develop the engine in time for the Tasman Championship series. The 2-litre engine uses transistorised ignition and Lucas fuel injection. Existing 1 1/2-litre B.R.M. engines can be modified to the same specification. Jack Brabham has ordered one such engine for his new Brabham BT8 sports/racing car. No prices have been released at the time of going to press. – E. L. W.