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Autopress Ltd., Bennett Road, Brighton, have published “Ford Autobook One,” by Philip H. Smith, A.M.I.-MEC.E.: (160 pp., 10 in.x 8 in.), which is an illustrated workshop manual applicable to all Ford cars derived from the 105E from September 1959 onwards, i.e., Anglia, Super Anglia, Classic, Capri, Cortina. Cortina GT, Lotus-Cortina, Corsair and Corsair GT. Over 2,000,000 Fords already in use are covered by this manual, and 1,000 more are coming on the road each week. It includes wiring diagrams, tuning notes, list of Ford dealers, etc., and costs 40s., post free.

Calendars are becoming quite a business! There is the fine Pirelli production; produced at a cost of £14,000, which involved flying the girls who appear scantily clad in its pictures out to Morocco, accompanied by a B.B.C. camera-team to see how it was done. Les girls, still in bikinis, went in a Rolls-Royce to the Carlton Towers Hotel for a reception to launch this exotic publication which, we hear, has a print-run of 32,000 copies. Applications for this Pirelli calendar have been coming in at the rate of 400 a day, a staff of five being required to deal with them. .

And there is the Vespa calendar, in which different model girls, each one named, pose, in bathing attire during the warmer months, with their Vespa scooters. But we apologise to those readers who tried to get Evershed’s of St. Albans Vintage-Car calendar, to which we referred last month—it will not be ready until 1967 and then not from book-sellers, although it might be worth trying to coax one from your local garage or motor agent, and trade reps. may care to order quantities now.

The Smithsonian Institution in Washington has published a detailed account of the early work of Chas. and Frank Duryea, of interest to veteran-car historians. The title is “The 1893 Duryea Automobile,” by Don H. Berkebile, Paper 34, pages 1-28, from U.S. National Museum, Bulletin 240.

To mark the centenary of the R.Aero.S, the Science Museum has issued a very beautifully-produced Four-in-One Book, “Aeronautics,” covering Early Aeronautics from 1868-1909, by C.H. Gibbs-Smith, Flying Since 1913, by G.W.B. Lacey, the Power to Fly (engines), by W.J. Tuck, and Aeronautica (prints, stamps, etc.), by W.T. O’Dea. The book (6 in. 6 in.) has 80 fine colour plates On very high-grade art paper and the introduction is by H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh. It is sold at 18s. by H.M. Stationery Office, Atlantic House, Holborn Viaduct, London, E.C.1.