3-litre Grand Prix Engines

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With the European Grand Prix season not yet begun the activity in the engine world is most interesting, and augurs well for the future of Grand Prix racing. Already plans of five different engines have been released, of which one has actually been raced, another consistently out on track testing, two on the test beds, and the fifth not far off that state. While having some things in common, they differ widely on the question of porting, and the accompanying diagrammatic drawings are intended to show the various layouts of inlet and exhaust ports, as well as cylinder and camshaft positions on the five major contenders that should be ready for the first Grande Epreuve. As yet there has been no detail news on the Gurney-Weslake V12, or the Honda engine.—D. S. J.

Maserati V12-Cylinder, four overhead camshafts, inlet ports downdraught between the camshafts on each bank of cylinders. This engine will be used by the Cooper Team for Jochen Rindt and Richie Ginther and the privately-owned Coopers of R. R. C. Walker and Guy Ligier.

Repco-Brabham V8-Cylinder. based on light alloy Buick engine. Repco cylinder heads have single camshaft operating in-line valves, downdraught inlet ports. This engine will be used by the Brabham team, for Jack Brabham and Denis Hulme.

B.R.M. H-16-Cylinder, being basically two horizontallyopposed 8-cylinder layouts one above the other, coupled by gears to a central gear. First engines will have four camshafts on each side, but later a single camshaft on each side will operate the inlet valves. Inlet ports are horizontal and lie between the valves of each cylinder. These engines will be used by the B.R.M. team for Graham Hill and Jackie Stewart, and will also be on sale to other chassis builders.

Ford V8-Cylinder, based on 1964 Indianapolis Ford engines. Four overhead camshafts, with downdraught inlet ports between camshafts on each bank and exhaust ports in middle of vee. These engines are modified by McLaren for use in the McLaren cars driven by Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon.

Ferrari V12-Cylinder, with four overhead camshafts, conventional inlet and exhaust port layout, and based on the 1965 Ferrari Prototype Le Mans cars. This engine will be used by the Ferrari team, whose drivers are not yet settled, other than John Surtees when he is fit again.

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