CT at Deauville

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Sir,

I read Cholmondeley Tapper’s book Amateur Racing Driver in my boyhood, and accordingly found your article on him (December issue) pleasantly nostalgic. It is gratifying that such a veteran amateur is still with us!

My copy of his delightful book has long-since disappeared, and it is rash to rely wholly on memory. However I believe that you may not have given the whole story of CT’s brush with Dr Farina at Deauville, in 1936, which culminated in the latter’s objection to CT starting the race with his Maserati “pulling to one side under heavy braking.” My recollection is that CT wanted to disconnect both front brakes and race on the rears only! If that is so, I wouldn’t blame Farina for objecting— and I have always felt a bit uncomfortable at CT’s emphasis on the “ironic” aspect of Farina’s subsequent race accident, in which Lehoux was killed. Amateurism should be made of kinder stuff!

Nino Farina was of course very much the professional works driver, and as such likely to be antipathetic to an unashamed amateur like CT. However he deserves credit for pioneering the “laid back” driving style, be it in Alfa, Maserati or Ferrari, and thereby inspiring B Bira and, more recently, Stirling Moss and the whole generation of post-1960 Grand Prix drivers. He was a leading runner for a score of years and, if I remember rightly, the first Campione del Mondo.

JACK MAURICE Northwood, Middlesex

In fact, what Cholmondeley Tapper wrote was that his mechanic Maurice and he finally succeeded in getting the brakes of three wheels working effectively, with the damaged drum changed from the front to the back wheel to diminish any tendency to “pull to one side.” VSCC racing men have no compunction against driving in events in which 4WB and rear only-braked cars run together, although I concede this is not, perhaps, quite the same. Yes, Dr Farina took the first Driver’s World Championship in 1950 with Alfa Romeo. WB