British GP faces legal wrangle

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

The three-cornered fight for the right to host the British Grand Prix has reached crisis point after FISA finally announced the proposed 1988 venue.

It seems the race will take place at Silverstone, as dictated by the exclusive deal which the Northamptonshire circuit signed with the Formula One Constructors Association for 1987-1991, but there is a strong possibility of legal action on behalf of both Brands Hatch and Donington Park as a result. Donington’s owner Tom Wheatcroft is suing the RAC Motor Sports Association for breach of contract, breach of duty and negligence, claiming that Britain’s national federation agreed as long ago as 1983 that his circuit should run the 1988 race.

Wheatcroft has already had a High Court writ served on the RAC claiming damages of more than £1.4-million in respect of work carried out on Donington’s facilities to enable it to qualify for a Formula One track licence, and is seeking an injunction to prevent arrangements being made concerning future British Grands Prix without consideration being given to the Leicestershire circuit’s case.

Having hosted this country’s premier motor race in alternate years since 1964, Brands Hatch managing director John Webb is also taking legal advice on the possibility of appealing to the European Court in Strasbourg, on the grounds that FISA’s apparent approval of the Silverstone/FOCA five-year contract represents a restriction on the Kent venue’s trade.

When the 1988 Formula One calendar was discussed at a FISA conference in Paris in December, the RAC MSA supported Webb’s claim, suggesting that it would be in the best interests of British motor racing that more than one circuit was able to retain facilities of the quality necessary for staging F1 races. But the principle of alternation was “shot down in flames” by FISA, according to RAC MSA chief executive Peter Hammond, who feels that this disregard of Brands Hatch’s claim renders Donington’s action futile.

Clearly one of the major implications of the controversy is that the world governing body does not recognise the right of national federations to nominate the venue for their own Grands Prix. . .

Donington Park has been requesting the opportunity to run its first post-war “Grand Prix” since it reopened in 1977. Motorcycle Grands Prix, European Touring Car and Formula 3000 rounds have been held there in recent years.

Although Brands Hatch is considering legal action, Webb says he will not try to prevent Silverstone’s event taking place this year unless he is advised that this is necessary to prevent his case being jeopardised. Hopefully this means Britain will not fall into the same abyss as Canada, whose GP had to be cancelled in 1987 due to contractual litigation between rival sponsors and has only been listed as a reserve event for 1988.