Damien Smith

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Damien Smith, Editor

On a recent trip to Maranello, I took a welcome diversion into Modena on the way back to Bologna airport. I’d heard great things about the Museo Casa Enzo Ferrari, which opened just last March. It was all true. Firstly, the building is magnificent. The giant moulded structure in bright Modena yellow blends into the earth, the twin skylight ridges supposedly evoking the bonnet air intakes of a classic sports car. They look more like gills to me, as if the flank of some giant fish buried under the city is poking its way through the ground. Whatever, the contrast to the traditional red-brick building dwarfed beside it is striking. This house and workshop is where Enzo Ferrari was born in 1898 and contains an interactive display of his life, within a modern sculpture. Brooklands this is not.

Inside the giant yellow ‘fish’, cars are displayed like pieces of art in masses of white space. Each is mounted on a plinth, with information printed clearly in both English and Italian. An audio tour guides you past each and around the walls, where a chronological story of Ferrari’s working life includes rare photographs and artefacts.

The cars displayed are on loan from private owners all around the world. Until March 20, the theme is ‘The Great Challenges FerrariMaserati’, celebrating the rivalry between the city’s two great constructors and featuring a jaw-dropping range of 1950s and ’60s sports racers and single-seaters from both.

The museum has no official ties to either Ferrari or Maserati — and is all the better for it. But there are organised tours in which you can take in both this and the official Museo Ferrari in Maranello, as featured in last month’s issue.

To those paying a pilgrimage to Maranello, you should also visit this museum in Modena, about 20 minutes away. It’ll complete your trip. www.museocasaenzoferrari.it

*

Awards season kicked off in London, Sebastian Vettel was in town to bask in the afterglow of his incredible achievements. And why not? At the age of just 25, he has matched the title achievements of Jack Brabham, Jackie Stewart, Niki Lauda, Nelson Piquet and Ayrton Senna. For someone with Vettel’s admirable appreciation of F1 history, this will actually mean something.

On such occasions, it always strikes me just how fresh-faced our new three-time champ really is. Red Bull’s golden boy is an engaging character, too. But the schoolboy charm should never be mistaken for naivety. Cold, hard ambition is the fuel behind Vettel’s huge natural talent. On track, we’d argue he’s not yet quite a match for Fernando Alonso. Off-track, Sebastian’s the most clinical operator out there — witness his close friendship with 82-yearold Bernie Ecclestone. What do they have in common? It’s perhaps the most intriguing relationship in F1 today.

*

Well this made a change. At one awards dinner, we weren’t just politely applauding others as another trophy was dished out. This one was for one of our own. Yes, we’ve won an award, too. Congratulations to associate editor Ed Foster, who has been honoured by the Guild of Motoring Writers with a ‘new media’ award for our website audio podcasts. Now, as Ed was quick to point out, the podcasts are a big team effort and we were all delighted at the recognition. More guests will join us each month in 2013, but if you haven’t yet listened in, log on to www.motorsportmagazine.com to hear past shows featuring the likes of Christian Homer, Patrick Head, Damon Hill, Derek Bell and many more. They’re fun to record, and they’re pretty good to listen to as well.

You may also like

Related products