Precision, February 2015

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Keeping an eye on the time: new releases and bygone classics
by Richard Holt

Roger Dubuis

You know where you are with cars. Whether you are in the market for a road-legal racer or a frill-free shopping car, you have access to a load of information telling you just what it can do: your purchase is underpinned by stats.

With watches things are less simple. Not that the performance of mechanical watches isn’t important, far from it. Very many hugely skilled people dedicate their genius to making wristwatches with inner workings that function with ever-increasing brilliance.

It’s just that, for the average punter, such things are a little difficult to quantify. That’s why reputation is so important. You may not know exactly how your watch is better than the next person’s, but you know it should be because it is from a grand old brand with a long and lofty history, whereas his is from some newbie maker barely old enough to vote. So it’s all the more impressive to consider the speed with which Roger Dubuis has gained repute.

The company was formed in 1995 on the crest of a wave of confidence in an industry getting used to that fact that no amount of electronic gizmology would stop people feeling passionately about the lovely little clockwork machines on their wrists.

Founded by a Geneva watchmaker who gave the company his name, Monsieur Dubuis and business partner Carlos Dias concentrated on carving out a place in a crowded market using a combination of exuberant design and horological excellence. Roger Dubuis rightly makes much of the fact that every stage of the manufacturing process is certified by the Geneva Seal, a rigorous quality control system.

Now part of Richemont’s enviable stable of high-end brands, Roger Dubuis has made a speciality out of skeletonisation, the process of painstakingly trimming away all unnecessary parts from the watch mechanism, allowing you to see the wheels and the gears working away. It has now revealed two new watches and with it is rather boldly declaring 2015 the “Year of the Skeleton”.

The Excalibur Spider Skeleton Flying Tourbillon takes the theme beyond the movement itself, cutting metal from the hands and case as well. The Excalibur Automatic Skeleton, meanwhile, is its first self-winding skeleton, incorporating a micro-rotor in the pared-back design.

Both watches display the signature Roger Dubuis star, a reminder that, however important the engineering may be, these watches are a bold style statement. In a world where it can be hard to know what you are getting, Roger Dubuis puts it all out there for you to see.

Meistersinger

From a watch that gives you a lot to look at, to one that is an exercise in beautiful simplicity. Seeing it for the first time, you may be forgiven a double-take at its singularity. But the concept of one-handed timekeeping is nothing new, with sundials and early mechanical clocks rendering the minute hand a bit of a latecomer.

MeisterSinger has been making one-handers since 2001 and has won many design awards. The new Circularis is a first for the company, having a movement that is designed in-house, although made in Switzerland. The large 43mm face and five-minute intervals make it easy to tell the time as accurately as you need for anything short of a rocket launch, but this is not a watch for those worried about counting the seconds.

The £3500 Circularis comes in three different colours with either an alligator strap or stainless-steel wristband.

www.meistersinger.net

Past master
Ref. 1579 chronograph

From young upstarts to a grand master. Celebrating its 175th year, Patek Philippe is a watchmaker that commands respect from all corners. One of its most sought-after pieces is the Ref. 1579 chronograph, introduced in 1943.

Most of them were made in yellow or pink gold, but much more rarely in steel, like this 1947 example. It is only the ninth steel example to appear in a public sale, according to Christie’s, who sold this one in the Hong Kong Important Watches sale for HK$4.7m (circa £390,000).

That is a relative bargain, however, compared to the even rarer platinum model. There are said to be only three in existence, with prices comfortably into seven figures, providing you can find someone willing to sell.

www.patek.com
www.christies.com

You may also like

Related products