Tougher than the "Exeter."

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One of the most important events of the year “down under” is the Sydney-to-Melbourne and back trial. In the 1929 test weather conditions were very severe as were the regulations. All bonnets were sealed and the competitors were required to drive from Sydney to Melbourne, a distance of 572 miles, non-stop except for the stipulated time at controls. They arrived at Melbourne in the evening and the cars were then locked up until the following afternoon when the return trip, over the same route, was started. Throughout the whole of the second day’s run, a violent head-wind was encountered and blinding dust, ” V ” gutters, creek beds and mountain ranges contributed to the difficulties, especially in view of the fact that an average speed of 26 m.p.h. was set. Two of the smallest cars in the trial were Junior Sports Singers and both finished without the loss of a single mark.

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