THE R.A.C. RALLY. 1,000-MILES EVENT FOR NEXT MARCH.

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THE R.A.C. RALLY. 1,000-MILES EVENT FOR NEXT MARCH.

THE rally type of event has long been popular on the Continent, and it certainly provides a welcome and refreshing change from the more normal reliability trial, in that considerable choice of route is open to the competitors.

The event which is to be organised by the R.A.C. and will be run at the beginning of March next, is to be over a distance of 1,000 miles. The finishing point will be at Torquay, and the routes may be selected from the choice published by the R.A.C. from whom all particulars can be obtained. The starting points from which

choice may be made are the following :—London, Bath, Leamington, Buxton, Harrogate, Norwich, Liverpool, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Edinburgh.

The trial will be divided into two classes—up to 1,100 c.c. and over that size, similar to the Monte Carlo event.

The trial will be run throughout at an average speed of 25 m.p.h. for the large class and 22 m.p.h. for the small cars, this average to include all stops. At the finish the cars will undergo an inspection for detail faults, and will then take part in a flexibility and brake test. Por the first 100

yards of this the driver will go as slowly as possible in top gear, and then turn within a radius of 30ft. and proceed to accelerate in a gear or gears he likes over a further 100 yds., at which point he must apply his brakes and stop in the shortest possible distance.

His figure of merit is then obtained by means of a formula.

The event should prove very attractive to those who cannot afford the time or expense of one of the Continental rallies, and it should also be good propaganda on behalf of motoring, which in spite of its development, still has much prejudice with which to contend.

British Empire Trophy.

/I is a great pity that the running of the Phoenix Park races in previous ye-trs has failed to provide a fintIncial success, and that the event will not be held again this year. However, Mr. Edwards, the enterprising Secretary of the B.R.D.C. has arranged another event for 1932, which will take place on April 30th, and called the British Empire Trophy.

His idea is to hold a race on the lines of the Monza affair, when a day’s racing will include heats and then a final, all being scratch races for real racing cars.

The Monza race is over about 150 miles, but these will be shorter, 50 miles each being suggested with a 100-mile final, so that the whole affair can be fitted into an afternoon. There are to be class races for 1,100 c.c., 2-litre, and unlimited, followed by the final for the first 3 or 4 in the first events. It is hoped that a foreign entry will be forthcoming, and the whole event should be one of the best ever staged at the track. The most joyful aspect of the affair is the return to scratch races, when the winner definitely wins, and there are no arguments.

Three Coventry Firms Combine.

OP recent years Riley cars have been the product of three separate organisations. The Riley Engine Co. built the 9 h.p. unit, whilst the Midland Motor Body Co. supplied the major portion of the coachwork. Both of these concerns have n,ow been taken, over by Riley (Coventry) Ltd..

La axuacnincing this arrangement, Mr. Victor Riley said that it would bring about considerable economies in working. It is interestin,g to learri that the 9 h.p. car had been. exhaustively tested by the Army authorities and that it is now

widely used in, the British Army both at home and overseas.

A Very Gallant Action.

SERIOUS acciden,t was narrowly averted recently near Bristol, where

a horse drawing a delivery van, on being frightened by a steam waggon. shied and galloped driverless through the main street of a village.

Children playing in the vicinity had an alarming experience, and would undoubtedly have been injured, but for the prompt and plucky action of an Automobile Association patrol, who dashed to the rescue, seized the reins, and succeeded after a terrific struggle in bringing the animal to a standstill.

Eventually the A.A. patrol, although injured, quietened the horse, and kept it under control until the arrival of the owner.

Winter Lubrication.

THE lubrication system of every car on the market has its own special characteristics. On many makes of car, for example, it is possible and is definitely advisable to change during the winter months to a lighter grade of oil.

But before such a change is made owners should consult the instructions issued by the manufacturers, or by the oil companies.

In, the choice of a suitable grade of oil many factors have to be taken into consideration.

First and foremost there is the type of lubrication, system employed. Another important factor is the speed and the temperature at which the engine works. Again, there is the quantity of oil in circulation and the system—if any—by which it is cooled.

Thus it is that two makes of car with roughly the same performance, and of the same horse power, will require different treatment in the winter. On the one it is perfectly safe to change over to a lighter grade of oil during the cold weather. The other, however, should be run on the same grade of oil throughout the year.

Take the case of two well-known “Nines.” On. one, Castrol XL. is recom.mended both for winter and summer use. On the other, owners are advised to change over to Castrol AA., a lighter grade of oil, during the winter.

Again, for old models of one very wellknown make of car, the Wakefield Company recommend, even. for summer motoring, Castrol P, the lightest of their standard grades. But for later models they recommend different grades for winter and summer use, both of them heavier than, Castrol F.

The requirement of every individual make, and in many cases of individual models, have to be taken into consideration before the manufacturers or the oil companies concerned can recommend this or that grade of oil.

Few ordinary motorists have sufficient technical knowledge to decide for themselves what grade of oil they should use. It is a matter for experts, and they should strictly follow the considered advice which the expert gives.

Earl Howe—A Correction.

IN a list of racing results of the 1931 season,, which was published in our last issue, an error crept in in regard to the placings in the Dieppe Grand Prix. Third. position in this event was secured by Earl Howe on a li-litre Delage, and not by de Maleplan.e (Maserati) as was stated. The latter was fourth.