THE J.C.C.'s NEW RACE

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ONCE again the Junior Car Club have shown that they can be relied upon to organize a race which is completely revolutionary in character. First the 200 Miles Race, which was a success in spite of dire prophesies,

then the Double Twelve (” no car will finish ” 1) and now the New Race, as yet unnamed.

The method of handicapping the various classes in the race can best be seen in the accompanying illustration, all cars having to negotiate an S bend in the Finishing Straight, after which the ” babies ” go straight ahead for the Byfleet banking, the larger cars having to make turns of varying severity, in accordance with their size, before setting off in pursuit of the others.

The advantages of this method are obvious, but none the less vital for all that. Cars will run level, with no handicap beyond their normal course. The score-board will be easy to read, and will mean what it showsl There will be a massed start (and, we hope, a massed finish). The first car past the post will be the winner, Slide rules may be left at home, and no mathematical calculations whatsoever will be required to be worked out in order to tell who is winning. Finally there will be plenty of corner-work to watch.

Regulations are not out yet, but the event will be for real racing cars, Mr. Dyer, the Secretary, tells me that there was some talk of trying to help the figure 200 in the length of the race, “just for old time’s sake,” but it is more probable that a time limit of about 6 hours will be used, say from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

We wish the race every success. It deserves a lot.