CONTINENTAL NEWS

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CONTINENTAL NEWS

A New Grand Prix ?

THE A.C. du Rhone have decided to organise a Grand Prix race through the streets of Villeurbanne. The circuit suggested has a length of 31 kilometres, and the race will be over 100 laps, or 350 kilometres in all.

The date has been tentatively fixed for some day in the first fortnight of June, presumably on a Sunday, but whether this race will attract entries from such events as the Eifel Race and Lwow G.P. which are already on the International Calendar is a doubtful point. It would probably be wiser for the A.C. du Rhone to wait until some race on the Calendar is abandoned, and then fix their date accordingly.

The Grand Prix of Algeria.

It is stated that a group of wealthy Algerian sportsmen are combining their efforts to organise the Grand Prix Algeria some time in May.

The Italian Championships.

As a result of the championship held each year by the R.A.C. d’Italia, the following awards have been made : 1, Fagioli (G.P. d’Italia and Coppa Acerbo) ; 2, Nuvolari (Circuit Bordino and Coppa Ciano) ; 3, Varzi (Tripoli) ; 4, Brivio (Targa Florio); 5, Trossi (PontedecimoGiovi) ; 6, Borzacchini (Susa-Mont-Ccnis) ; 7, Tadini (Stelvio) ; 8, Bonetto (first Italian in G.P. di Monza).

Championships are also held for the 1,500 c.c. and 1,100 c.c. classes, and these were gained by Louis Castelbarco (for the second year in succession) and Nando Barbieri respectively. The amateur title was won by the Marquis G. M. Cornaggia Medici, followed by Ristelli and Charles Castelbarco. As usual, the car championship was won by Alfa-Romeo,

Caracciola’s Plans.

The German champion, Rudolf Caracciola, was greatly missed by all followers of motor-racing on the Continent last season, for he can always be depended upon to take his place among the leaders of a race.

We are glad to report that Caracciola has now been passed as fit by the doctors who have been regularly attending him since his bad accident while practicing for the 1933 Monaco G.P. when his thigh was fractured in no less than six places.

After a few months recuperation at the Winter Sports—Caracciola generally goes to Arosa—the famous German driver will take his place in the new team of Mercedes-Benz racing cars of 2.9 and 3.8 litres capacity which will compete in all the principal events of 1934. The other drivers will be Manfred von Brauchitsch, the motor-cyclist Ernst Henne, and a young amateur called Bernet.

The Auto. Union racing car.

The racing car which will defend the colours of the German Auto Union (Horsch Wanderer, Audi and D.K.W.) is still

shrouded in mystery. It has been designed by Dr. Porsch, and is generally referred to in Continental circles as the Porschwagen. Others call it the P for short.

The greatest secrecy is being observed in the construction and testing of the car, but the single machine so far completed at Chemonitz has been seen at the Nurburg Ring. It was seen to have its 16 cylinder 3,200 c.c. engine at the rear, the two banks of cylinders being side by side. The power output is rumoured to be 300 h.;:. and the maximum speed to be in the region of 155 m.p.h. The fuel tank is placed at the forward end of the car, and the driver sits in a single seat in the middle. The whole car is said to be lower than the single seater Alfa Romeo, and is perfectly streamlined.

Some idea of the secrecy which shrouds the whole affair can be judged by the fact that the drivers did not even know that the car had been finished and taken to Nurburg Ring. Then an urgent message was sent to Hans Stuck, the Prince of Leiningen, Momberger and Sebastian for a preliminary inspection of the new machine.

Its performance will be watched with great interest in the first race in which it appears.

The Bugatti team get down to it.

Ettore Bugatti is nothing if not thorough. He is not content with merely engaging two well known drivers to handle his team of 2.8 litre cars in 1934, and letting them take over the cars just before the first race. Instead, he has made it a clause of their contract that Rene Dreyfus and Jean P. Wimille should go to live near Molsheim, and should work each day in the Bugatti factory. By this means he hopes to give his drivers a complete training in the construction and mechanical details of the cars, which is bound to reflect on their actual driving on the road.

For Indianapolis ?

Every year there is a rumour that one or two European drivers will go over to the States for the Indianapolis “500,” which is held in May. The latest driver who is supposed to be making the trip is Raymond Sommer, but which car he will drive is not yet decided.

Incidentally. Sommer has ordered a 3 litre Maserati for 1934, but it is also possible that he will drive an entirely new car designedAby,Lindependent engineers.

Good prize-money at Rheims. The Automobile club de

The Automobile club de Champagne are unsparing in their efforts to ensure the success of the Grand Prix de la Manic. They have made the Rheims circuit a model of what a road course should be. The permanent concrete grandstands are comfortable and well appointed, and the road surface is kept in good shape. A good entry is always attracted, and the 1934 race should be well up to standard. The prize money has already been

allotted, and is as follows : 1st, 100,000 francs ; 2nd, 50,000 francs ; 3rd, 25,000 francs ; 4th, 15,000 francs ; 5th, 12,000 francs ; 6th, 10,000 francs ; 7th, 8,000 francs ; 8th, 7,000 francs ; 9th, 5,000 francs ; 10th, 3,000 francs. At the present rate of exchange the first prize works out at something like £1,200—something like a prize !

The Grand Prix d’Auvergne. The name of Auvergne, avill always be

name associated in the min, ds 4 niotor-raeing enthusiasts with the fanfons GordonBennett Cup of 1905, won by Thiery on aBrasier. Now the A.C. d’Auvergne are going to organise a race again, and have booked a fixture on the International Calendar for 1934.

Three circuits are under consideration. The first is of the “round the houses” variety and measures 3 kilometres. The second is a more sporting course on open roads, and includes the hill of Baraque, up which a climb is held every year ; this circuit measures 11 kilometres, but has certain difficulties in the way of access for spectators. Finally a course of 4 kilometres alongside the stadium at Vichy is being investigated, and the club has decided to let the choice be determined by an official of the A.C.F.

Racing in Sweden.

Following the bad accidents which took place in the motor-cycle Grand Prix at Vram and the car race at Saxtorp, the Swedish Automobile Club has decided not to organise its Summer and Winter Grand Prix races next year. There is a possibility, however, of a touring car race being substituted, but this race would probably be just as dangerous as the others, for it was touring cars which started the ” pile-up ” in the Summer Grand Prix.

Etancelin and Moll to drive Maseratis.

The ban on the sale of monoposto Alfa Romeo to foreign drivers is having the inevitable effect of increasing the orders for Maseratis.

Among those erstwhile .Alfa Romeo drivers who have changed over to the Bologna firm are Philippe Etancelin and Guy Moll. Etancelin actually ordered his car some time ago, and has been promised delivery by December 15th, but at the time of going to press we do not know whether he has actually secufed his machine. His intention is to be thoroughly prepared for next season in good time, so he has sent his mechanic Marius to the Maserati factory for a month. Then, when he gets the car, Etancelin is going to Montlhery for long and arduous practice, so that he will be fully at home with his new mount. He will be a dangerous rival in 1934.

Moll was on the verge of placing an order for a monoposto Alfa Romeo, but was not satisfied with the price or delivery date. Now he has gone over to Maserati, and hopes to be ready in time for the Pau C-1,P, on February 19th.