THE TRIUMPH "GLORIA" (Continued from page I22)

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THE TRIUMPH ” GLORIA ” (Continued from page 122).

which has to be dodged on a winding road. The second is that the steering, while being light and accurate at low speeds, could be rather more positive at the car’s maximum–especially over indifferent road surfaces. The self-centering action is not particularly powerful, and an increased caster would probably do the trick. On the other hand this slight

” wander ” may be due to insufficient bracing of the front of the chassis, but in any case it does not become evident until a speed of 60 m.p.h. or over has been reached. When we bear in mind the noble way in which the Triumph stood up to its work we feel almost ashamed of finding even these two small faults with it, and

our abiding remembrance is of au extraordinarily willing car, with a small tax, which bears the most attractive coachwork we have seen in many a long day.

At £,285 it should provide pleasant motoring for many who requeri their cars to be something more than a mere form of transport.

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