G. E. T. EYSTON'S PLANS.

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48

G. E. T. EYSTON’S PLANS.

There is probably no more ardent record-breaker in the world than G. E. T. Eyston—if we can except” Ab ” Jenkins ! Be that as it may, it is the latter’s meteoric 24-hour run at close on 130 m.p.h. which has decided Eyston upon a plan which is equalled in magnitude only by Sir Malcolm Campbell’s journeys to Daytona and Verneule Pan. Easton has become famous for his 130 m.p.h. records on the old Panhard et Levassor, but with Montlhery as his only available track he has naturally reached the limit of speed in relation to tyre wear during long distance record attempts. In addition, the measuring line at Montlhery is extremely disadvantageous. The records at present

held by Jenkins are unassailable, except under similar conditions to those obtaining in Utah, and it is to this far-distant place that Eyston is planning to take a special car next summer.

The design of the car is not yet complete, but it will almost certainly be powered by an ex-aero engine, a system which offers a considerable saving in constructional costs, albeit at the expense of weight. To counteract this, however, it must be remembered that huge engines of this nature revolve at a comparatively slow speed, and are therefore possessed of a high degree of reliability. The vast plains of the Salt Beds allow a ” circuit” of some ten miles or more to be mapped out, and the radius of the

turn is thus so gradual that the car is, to all intents and purposes, travelling in a straight line, reducing tyre wear to the absolute minimum compatible with the speed and weight of the car.

Eyston will have a big advantage over Jenkins in the matter of maximum speed. The Pierce-Arrow cannot be capable of much over 140 m.p.h., while Eyston’s new car will probably reach 200 m.p.h. allowing a cruising speed well within the scope of the engine.

It is too early as yet to give final details of the adventure, but it is certain that Eyston’s faithful henchman (and brilliant driver) Albert Denly will accompany him. Additional drivers have not been decided.

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