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Sir, I read with interest your reference to the ” mystery ” of the sports E.R.A. under ” Rumblings ” in the November issue. I think that perhaps the following observations may be of interest to your readers in solving the mystery : Towards the end of 1937 my brother and I, when up at the E.R.A. works, were shown the then new sports engine by the late Murray Jamieson, who not only described it to us in detail, but also told us of some of the teething troubles which were being experienced. There was one complete engine which had just come off test and another completely stripped down. I can solve the whereabouts of the chassis for this engine, as none was ever made, Jamieson’s idea being, as he told

us, first to produce and perfect the engine before commencing the construction and production of the ac tual chassis.

Only a few months later Jamieson’s tragic death occurred, so that, I believe, very little further progress was made on the engine, which must therefore, I think, still be regarded as very experimental, and certainly the chassis was never produced at all.

As regards the ” hush-hush ” 5-litre engine, I note that the new owner will say nothing, but in the absence of any definite evidence to the contrary, I am of the opinion that it is, in fact, not an E.R.A. production at all, but an experimental engine designed by Murray Jamieson for the invicta people, but which never went into production.

I saw this engine at Bourne at tlae same time as the sports E.R.A. and fancy it was built round about the time when Raymond Mays was running his modified 41-litre sports Invieta so successfully at Shelsley and on the Mountain Circuit. I think there may have been some connection between the production of this 5-litre engine by Murray Jamieson and the rumour that appeared in the motoring Press at that time to the effect that Raymond Mays and Humphrey Cook were co-operating in the production of a team of G.P. cars based on the Invictawhich, of course, did not actually materialise until some years later, when the Riley six-cylinder formed the basis and, as we all know, the E.R.A. resulted.

I believe that E.R.A. did produce an experimental G.P. car, which underwent test -at Donington, but I do not think that it was of above about 2i-litres capacity.

I should like to ascertain the present whereabouts of the ex-Mays “VilliersSupercharge.” So far as I know, after S. G. Cummings had raced it so successfully in sprint events up and down the country during the 1935 and 1986 seasons, the engine was taken out and fitted in a G.P. Bugatti chassis, the resultant machine making a brief appearance at one of the Wetherby Speed Trials during 1937 or 1938 in the hands of P. D. Walker (of E.R.A. fame).

I should be much obliged to any readers • who can give me any information as to the present whereabouts of either this machine or its original chassis and cream body. I should also like to find out what has become of its sister car—the Vauxhall Villiers once raced by David Brown.

Best wishes for the continued success of MOTOR SPORT. I am, Yours etc.,

PATRICK GREEN.

R.A.F. [Can anyone assist Mr. Green in his search ? We believe the David Brown Vauxhall Villiers chassis was used by Arthur Baron for the Buick-engined single-seater he built for Greenford, now owned by I. Metcalfe.—Ed.] Sir, If any other readers of MOTOR SPORT have had any experience of the 12-h.p. A.C. 2-seater car of about 1926 vintage,

I would be very pleased to hear from them.

I have just rescued one. from a breaker’s yard (engine No. 5749) because of its extremely . tight construction, differential and gearbox in one unit, and Anzani engine.

I feel that it should have pretty good performance and could be made into an interesting “Special.” Top speed is not very high, about 60 m.p.h. (3,600 r.p.m.) and 40 m.p.h. in second, according to my calculations. It will be difficult to fit front wheel brakes, without altering the suspension to Frazer-Nash pattern, and at present

no shock-absorbers are fitted. Surely a car designed by S. F. Edge should not be allowed to become extinct ?

In conclusion, congratulations to MOTOR SPORT for carrying on as usual and giving us enthusiasts something to look forward to each month. I am, Yours etc.,

D. C. HINGS. 15, Chiltern Avenue,

Bushey, Herts.