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24

common with the Cotal box, which is, however, 100 per cent. reliable otherwise.

The Delage is some 8 or 9 m.p.h. faster than the Daimler in ultimate maximum speed and a good deal snappier en route ; it also sounds distinctly busy under the bonnet towards the upper revolutions. The suspension and road-holding are good, though a certain combination of pot-holecum-corner makes the steering kick almost like a Lancia. Starting, by contrast to the Daimler, is splendid (even on the handle)—the electrical equipment is shoddy and troublesome, especially the starter.

Thus, whilst the Delage may appeal more to some people than the Daimler and vice versa to others, I cannot see that the Delage is in any way superior to the Daimler. Moreover, I am prepared to bet (a) that the Delage is heavier than the Daimler ; (b) that in 61,000 miles the Deluge will, in costs for labour and for spare parts charged theoretically at the same price as the equivalent Daimler part, have cost double what Messrs. Daimler Hire have had to spend on the car under review.

To all this Mr. John Bolster can, if he thinks it worth while, reply with perfectly true reports of a 1987 D.6-70 which has covered something approaching 61,000 miles in an extraordinarily trouble-free manner. In fact, he can chew my opinions to ribbons. I cannot really explain this. It may be my bad driving or my sheer bad luck, or even the possibility that by 1938 the rot had begun to set in in the “decadent French democracy.” I am discounting here the fact that, during some of the time, my Delage has had to stagger about with a gas plant slung on the back, for I do not think this can have influenced all or even any of the difficulties at which I have hinted.

The old query comes to mind, whether among more or less mass-produced cars there can be such a thing as a real black sheep. I am, Yours etc.,

Hudnall Common, PETER CLARK. Berkhamsted. [This personal appeal to Mr. Bolster to defend his Deluge is published because we know Mr. Clark to be a good friend of his. In the ordinary way, such personal challenges cannot be published, unless arising from articles or correspondence.— Ed.]