RUMBLINGS, January 1944

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Makers’ Dictum

The Instruction Book Library has shaped very nicely indeed, and books continue to arrive. It is a scheme which will be of greater value, we hope, after the war, but meanwhile odd bits of information are requested, and supplied. Apart from the value of the ” gen ” in this not inconsiderable assortment of instruction books, some of them contain rare gems of humour or originality, as witness the following :

(a) ” The will cruise comfortably at 60 m.p.h. and is built to stand the strain equally with a car of 21 times its rated h.p.–provided you reflect that at this speed its engine develops 4.363 revolutions per minute (on top gear). Consequently, all moving parts need sympathetic attention if the practice is habitual.”

(b) ” brooklands track has an exceedingly bad surface, and were it an ordinary 20-ft. wide road, no motorist would dream of driving at full speed over it. We advise our customers not to accelerate the wear of their cars by lapping Brooklands all out.” (e) ” The 8-cylinders engine does not’ swing’ before stopping. Its sharp stopping does not therefore mean at all that it is ‘ seized.’ “

(d) ” Never accost a flame to look into the inferior of the accumulators as the hydrogen and oxygen remaining after the charge would ignits with an explosion.”

(e)” For shifting from 3rd to 4th speed, pull frankly lever towards driver. Usually for shifting from 4th to 3rd speed, from 3rd to 2nd, and from 2nd to 1st, one uses to operate frankly the lever as soon as disengaging the clutch.” (f) . . . case must be taken never to use full-lock, or anywhere near it, when the car is travelling at any

speed. .

(g) ” The acceleration of the car is such that, cruising at 45 it will pass 95 per cent, of the traffic on the road at a material economy of oil, petrol and supervision.”

Annual Event

Punctually. Vol. IV of the Harborough Publishing Co.’s ” Aircraft of the Fighting Powers,” by II. .1. Cooper and O. G. Thetford, -edited by D. ;1,.. Russell, M.I.Mech.E., is to h:)1)(1. It contains photographs, 1:72nd scale plans, and descriptive

, matter relating -to some 80 or 90 military aircraft of I 943. the aircraft of 1940)42 being covered in 1,Tols. I The latest volume contains extra photographs of the larger machines, as the plans which require a folder now back on to a pilot 04.Traphic spread. Aircraft of Gt. Britain, Canada, (‘;.S.A.. l’.S.S.R.„11apan and Germany are covered, our new 1 y pcs Itch ig the Hurricane D, Typhoon, Spitfire V. Spit lire IX, Mosquito II, Blenheim V, Lancaster II, Halifax II, Horsa, Oxford IV and’V, Magister 11, Miles M-28, Martinet T, Defiant

II T.T.,, Auster II, and NVarferry I. The book is remarkably good value at one guinea, and it is a treat to enjoy such good print, not only in the text, but in the advertising pages, particularly those taken by our American allies. The last page is devoted to photographs of the Ayr° York, and it is calmly stated that, although details of this aircraft were released too late for full inclusion, this machine will be covered in Vol. V, which will appear on Monday, December 4th, 1944. That is a nice example of unquenchable optimism which one expects, knowing Mr. Russell, but may we temper it with the hope that this volume will include nmny commercial aircraft to supplement the 1944 military types ?

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