NEW BOOKS

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NEW BOOKS

At this time of year books are seasonable and, as one enthusiast, who has long since laid up his 3-lit re Bentley, remarks, “They are about the only thing one can spend one’s money on nowadays.” A particularly fine publication that comes along at this time of year is the liarborough Publishing Company’s “Aircraft of the Fighting Powers,” by H. J. Cooper and 0. G. Thetford, edited by D. A. Russell, M.I.Mech.E. This book is so beautifully produced, both as to editorial and advertising pages, and the quality of its photographs and 1/72nd 8-view g.a. drawings, that it suggests something out of America rather than a book created in fly-bombed London. Vol. 5 contains descriptions, histories and specifications of 70 1944 aircraft, none of them covered in previous volumes, with plans and photographs of each. The air power of Great Britain, Australia, America, Russia, Germany and Japan is covered. The new British aircraft comprising the Tornado, Typhoon, Hurricane II, Spitfire VII, VIII, IX, XI and XII, Miles M-20, Mosquito III and IV, Mosquito PR, Gloster F9/37, Beaufighter X, Barracuda, Auster, Albemarle, Warwick, Hamilear, Halifax, York, Sunderland III and Procter TV, A C, G, Grey foreword, an

aircraft markings and designations compendium, and an M.A.P. colour standards chart are included. This very attractive reference work costs 1i guineas, and is worth every penny of it. It is of Vsignificance that Mr. Russell promised it by December 4th, and it was out to schedule ; Vol. 6 is promised by December 3rd, 1945. I’ Floyd Clymer’s Historical Motor Scrapbook, No. 2.” (Clymer Motors, I dollars.) Very different as to presentation, but exceedingly interesting, nevertheless, is the American production, ” Floyd Clymer’s Historical Motor Scrapbook No. 2,” which, like the earlier book, contains a very large selection of advertisements reproduced from all manner of old magazines ranging from 1899 to 1929, and also a continuation of Clymer’s life history. There is also a motor-cycle section, many odd facts and historical notes, photographs of last-war racing motor-cycles, and so on. Clymer hopes to continue the series until he has published something about every one of America’s 2,200 basic makes. He has also published a Steam-car Scrapbook, and intends to issue others on cycle-cars, electric cars, air-cooled cars, etc. Another ingenious line is the reproduction of early catalogues and the data relating to individual makes, and three such booklets cover the Stanley steamer, others dealing

with Doble, Locomobile, 1908 White, 191() Whitv, 1909 E.M.F. “:30,” V8 Chevrolet, T-Ford, G.P. Duesenberg, B.M.W. M/C and Jeep. These booklets cost from 35 e. to 81.50.

Those who feel they have the world’s automobile history taped (we exclude Mr. Doyle) should study Clymer’s astounding hook. They will lind details of the Enger V12 which, by slight shift of a lever, became a six, the 11-oilier-Laughlin V8 with f.w.d., the Continental-looking ReVere, the air-cooled l’ilevrolet of 1923, the radial rear-engined Julian [shades of the Entield-Alldays, North Lucas and Kendall] and many others. Those allalike-to-look-at _Americans of the 1920-25 Period arc liberally portrayed. This book should be in the bands of every veteran cultist. The publishers’ address is 2125, West Pico Street, Los Angeles, 6, California. The Internal Combustion Engine.” By A. H. Franks. (Pitman, 7s. 6d.) Those whose wives or girl-friends need a book telling them how a car works, or those who wish to have handy a ready reference to the modern car, should certainly obtain a CORN’ of •”l’he Internal Combust ion Engine ” which, belied by its title, covers the entire subject. and also contains a useful chapter On diesel engines. It is very well done and fully illoqratell,