The Unveiling of the B.R.M

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The first B.R.M. Grand Prix car, described elsewhere in this issue, was unveiled to the Press and distinguished visitors at Folkingham airfield, Lincolnshire, on December 15th. In a shed on the airfield Donald McCullough, Chairman of the British Motor Racing Research Trust, briefly outlined the aims behind the B.R.M. project. Before the Trust Committee and representatives of the R.A.C., etc., stood the B.R.M., covered by a dust-sheet. Earl Howe was asked to unveil it, which he did amid a display of great enthusiasm amongst the visitors. After short speeches by Raymond Mays and Peter Berthon, in the course of which they both asked the R.A.C. to press for continuance of Formula 1 racing for which the B.R.M. has been built, the car was pushed out to the airfield perimeter track and demonstrated by Mays.

After he brought the car in he was called upon to spend much time in the bitter wind posing for the Press cameras and making a speech for the news-reel men—an amusing incident happened during this speech, when a cameraman, intent on leaving with his precious pictures, started up his motor-cycle and drowned Mays’ voice. He was asked to push his machine out of ear-shot but miscalculated the penetrating power of its exhaust and again cut in on Mays’ talk. If you look carefully at one of the pictures in this month’s centre-spread you will see a policeman shooing it away. We only hope Mays’ will not be heard telling cinema-audiences of the B.R.M.’s V16 engine to the accompaniment of a single-cylinder crackle!

After this historic ceremony visitors were allowed free access to the works at Bourne, but here photography was forbidden. The test-house, machine shop, assembly bay and drawing office, etc., were open to inspection and many parts of the B.R.M. were available for examination.

Public contributions to the Trust are invited and should be sent to the Trust Secretaries, Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., 11, Ironmonger Lane, London, E.C.2.

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