The Le Mans H.R.G.

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Arising out of our road-test of Peter Clark’s Le Mans H.R.G. in the last issue, although Eric Thomson’s car did not receive a complete overhaul between the Le Mans and Spa races, it did, in fact, have its body removed and its engine given a “top overhaul,” while brakes and running gear were checked and the sump dropped to look for traces of metal. This was a routine check planned for all three H.R.G.s. Incidentally, the small external pipelines which we noticed running from the water pump to the off-take rail actually go right through it to located jets in the head which play on to sodium-filled candles inset into the narrow bridge-pieces between the combustion spaces. Consequently, the Singer engine never “pinks” and on methanol never “runs on.”