Moss goes motoring!

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Stirling Moss, Leslie Johnson John Cutts and David Humphrey deserve the congratulations of all who imagine they are fast drivers, for getting a new Humber Super Snipe through fifteen European countries, 3,280 miles, in three days 18 hours, an average running speed of over 40 m.p.h. under winter conditions and over roads, always wet, often icy, throughout. The Press received exciting Rootes bulletins of the car’s progress, but fog held it in Lisbon after the finish when it should have been flown home to a Press reception.

The new Humber Super Snipe has moved up into the true high-performance class, with its 4-litre 113-b.h.p. “Blue Riband” engine. Finding that it is too new to qualify for entry in this month’s Monte Carlo Rally, the competition-minded Rootes Organisation, through Norman Garrad their Competition Manager, arranged this searching test of the new model. The route was from Oslo in Norway to Lisbon in Portugal, via Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, Italy, Jugo-Slavia, France and Spain. The aim was to make this long journey in five days, accurate timing to catch numerous ferries being essential. In fact, so well did the boys drive and the Super Snipe run, that the objective was achieved in six hours less than four days.

The route is some 50 per cent, longer than those of the Monte Carlo Rally and the Alps had to be crossed into Italy, six passes being taken in 70 miles. The Humber was standard except for extra lamps. The appropriate flag was flown on its own little mast as each frontier was successfully crossed.

Many enthusiasts cannot help envying drivers who can engage in. such exciting and purposeful motoring, but all will be warm in their praise of the crew and the Humber.—W. B.