Vintage Postbag, January 1957

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Sir.

It was pleasing to read in Motor Sport that you are re-opening “Vintage Veerings”—long may it continue. It would be interesting to have some notes on that little-known Italian make O.M., which I believe once won a Mille Miglia.

Up to about two years ago two perfect specimens were in this district, the property of an elderly owner since deceased. One, a side-valve model with four-seater body to International dimensions and having wooden fairings on the front axle, was reputed to have belonged to a Mr. Morris of R. A. G. Carburettors and to have been driven by R. F. Oates in Brooklands 500-Mile and other events. Its registration was GJ 24. The other was an o.h.v. push-rod with two plugs per cylinder, fired by Bosch coil and Scintilla magneto, and might have been a T.T. model (CJH 222).

Both cars were beautifully finished and had underslung rear ends and were of really modern design. Presumably they were made by the same firm that now constructs heavy lorries, etc. One wonders who designed then, and why were they no longer made? Perhaps someone could enlighten us.

I am, Yours, etc., C. H. Sutton. Woodbridge.

 

Sir,

Following the recent comments on the vintage Hillman sports car, this would seem to be an opportune time to try and uncover some information about the ordinary touring Hillman of that era.

I enclose a photograph of mine, which is a 1921 10.4-h.p. model in almost original condition and one of two registered with the V.S.C.C. Although it is quite orthodox, it is a very well-made and finished motor car with an engine that appears almost Edwardian in conception. It seems unusual that so few specimens of what must have been a fairly common car have survived, and if any reader knows the whereabouts of a similar model or can enlighten me with some of the history of the early Hillman, I would be very pleased to hear from him.

In conclusion, it is good to see the revival of what used to be one of the most interesting features in Motor Sport. May “Veteran-Edwardian-Vintage” thrive.

I am, Yours, etc., R. C. Fenning. Coltishall. 

 

Sir,

I have recently acquired a Duesenberg-engined Roamer of approximately 1920 vintage, the car being made by the Bentley Car Manufacturing Co., Kalamazoo, Mich.

The car has been standing for over 30 years and although everything appears to be in working order, before I start stripping and reassembling I would prefer to have some information on it, e.g., wiring diagram, etc.

I would be very pleased if you could let me know where I might obtain the necessary information on this particular make.

The engine, incidentally, is a four-cylinder o.h.v., the valve stems being horizontal and actuated by long vertical rocker arms from the camshaft.

I am, Yours, etc., A. G. Jones. Llanelly.