"Speed Hill Climb" by C.A.N. May.

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190 pp. 8.4 in. x 5.5 in. (G. T. Foulis Co. Ltd., 1-5, Portpool Lane, London, E.C.I. 21s.)

Sprint motoring, in the form of speed trials and speed hillclimbs, has gained its second wind in Britain and is now again deservedly popular. C. A. N. May, who has written previously a history of Shelsley-Walsh and nostalgic books about trials when those took place up normal hills and were possible for fairly ordinary cars, now gives us a post-war refresher course on British speed hill-climbs, with maps of the dicing venues and nice pictures.

This is all right so far as it goes, although one feels that only the competitors and their friends are likely to buy the book, the rest of us being content to rely on memory or the files of the motoring jcurnals.

C. A. N. May has himself driven in the kind of events he decribes with the ex-Moss Cooper 500 but this is not hill-climb autobiography and it appears that he has based his account on contemporary Press reports, so that nothing very new emerges, except when the author describes his own technique for a given climb.

Mr. May says that public-road speed hill-climbs ended after the accident at Kop early in 1925. In fact, one more was held before the ban fell. This, then, is a useful but neither essential nor exciting book, although if it had embraced the post-war Continental hill-climbs counting towards the European championships it would have been far more valuable. —W. B.

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