VW Service

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Sir,

Having read in the last three issues letters criticising the VW spares and service, please allow me space to relate an incident giving a brighter side to the picture:

In mid-July, 1963, I purchased a pre-1960 VW de luxe saloon from Beardalls of Nottingham, with some 47,000 miles on the clock. On 30th September last, late at night, I had the misfortune to have my windscreen shattered by a flying stone. At 10 a.m. the following morning I telephoned Beardalls (who, incidentally, I had not visited since purchase, even for petrol) and explained the position – I wanted the car for work, etc., etc. They had a windscreen in stock and promised to commence fitting same “as soon as you arrive.”

I arrived at the reception desk at 10.45 a.m., handed over the ignition key and asked if they could renew the speedo cable also whilst I waited. I then prepared for a prolonged wait, but happily a large pile of motoring magazines, a radio, a coffee brewing machine and a tank of tropical fish were provided to while away the time. At 11.45 a.m. the foreman handed me the keys, informing me that the windscreen had been completed and a new speedo cable fitted (the latter free although I had driven the car approximately 100 miles per day since purchase) and the glass had been swept from the interior of the car. All this for less than £5.

I have in the 16 weeks of ownership covered 11,000-odd miles of brisk motoring and have not had reason to regret my purchase. The moral of this story is, of course, that I, a very satisfied customer, will again turn to Wolfsburg for my car.

But what of Mrs. Carey and D. M. Williams? Are they satisfied? Their letters pose a question:–

Is there a genuine shortage of spares in any part or whole of the country? (Other readers may be able to help here). If so, will VW headquarters let us know why and where the hold-up is, i.e., is it in London or Wolfsburg?

Come on VW P.R.O.s – keep the good name you undoubtedly have.

Derbyshire. J. R. Hartshorn.