Record Breaking

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Although record attempts are by no means so frequent as they were before the war, this form of high-speed motoring is not defunct. Apart from the abortive British Vita project, outlined above, Wallace Arnold Sales and Service Ltd. attempted to capture long-duration International Class G (751 to 1,100 c.c., not up to 1,000 c.c. as both British Vita and Motor seem to think) records last year, at Montlhéry. They used a Vauxhall Viva HB with a Westune-prepared, overbored HA engine. The drivers were Allerton, Brett, Bowler, Jones and Myerscough. After various troubles the attempt was called off, but not before the Vauxhall had averaged over 83 m.p.h. for three days. Incidentally, if interest revives in record-breaking one would wish for proper documentation of the position by the Competitions Department of the R.A.C. Before the war it was possible to buy, for 1s., a book giving all the World’s, International Class, C.I. and British records (note the pre-war designations), corrected up to the end of March 1938, while for a fee of 10s. a year the R.A.C. would post to anyone interested printed notices of any alteration, as soon as fresh records were confirmed by the F.I.A. Today such services would presumably be several times more expensive, but with the great increase in interest in everything to do with competition motoring, and the very many more clubs and firms involved, their re-introduction would surely be worthwhile. Short of visiting the holy archives in Pall Mall, or taking a trip to Paris, one can only keep track of the records situation by fumbling through back issues of “Automobile Year” or consulting an American Club publication to which only a limited number of interested parties has access and which can be up to 12 months out of date.

But, alas, the R.A.C. does not appear interested in encouraging record attempts, judging by the fact that successful competitors at Elvington, who set new car records, have been told that it will cost them something like 50 gns. each to have their successes homologated, whereas the A.C.U. makes no such charge for getting F.I.A. recognition of new motorcycle records.—W. B.