Concours d'Elegance

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Sir,
After reading your comments of the Goodyear Concurs d’Elegance at Halfpenny Green airfield I felt it was time some of the facts were put right. You quote in Motor Sport “unless the proud recipient is able and willing to drive his vehicle to the prize-winning dais”. [This was a general statement, not applicable specifically to Halfpenny Green.—Ed.] My father was asked before the prize-giving to start the Model-T Ford and be ready to drive to the prize-giving dais. This we did, only to be told by another marshal there were so many people around the prize tent it would be better to leave the “T” where it was and walk up to receive the awards, which we did.

The day before the Stourbridge event we were at the Rally of the Giants. We drove there and home again under our own steam. The only reason we took the “T” to the Goodyear Concours was at the request of the Stourbridge Car Club, who telephoned us at least twice asking if we would bring the Model-T along to their event. When we mentioned the Road Fund licence had expired and the only way would be by trailer, they said this was perfectly acceptable to them. As far as the Swift was concerned, I had no intention of leaving Bristol about 5 a.m. with one cylinder at about 18-20 m.p.h. maximum on August Bank Holiday to be at Halfpenny Green by 10 o’clock, and then to face the journey back with one cylinder, acetylene lamps and thousands of holiday people making their own way home. No thank you! I will leave that to the more dedicated.

Personally I think your article is a lot of sour grapes. We use our cars extensively throughout the season and maintain them to the highest standard. In so doing we give hundreds of people a lot of pleasure just seeing them, and we do not care a hoot if we win awards or not. Our satisfaction is being at these meetings and looking at the very high standard that is being reached with these lovely vehicles.

I thought the judging at Stourbridge was very good and fair; in fact, your results on the “T” and the Swift were the same as I would have judged them.

Perhaps this year when we do the South-west Coast run with the “T” (about 85 miles), or the Daffodil Run (80 miles), Weston-super-Mare (60 miles), Winscombe (50 miles) or Ammerdown (45 miles), just to name a few, all under our own steam, you might like to come along for the ride. [Yes, please, or 250 miles if you like! —Ed.)

A. C. Cook.
Kingswood.