The Ford Capri

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Sir,

I feel I must write in support of Mr. Martin’s letter in November issue in extolling the virtues of his Capri 3.0. I too recently purchased one, albeit a Ghia 3.0 having disposed of my Scimitar and would agree with all the comments made by Mr. Martin, with the exception of paintwork—mine is superb. I have now covered 7,000 miles in just over two months, including 1500 in Spain with no faults of any kind. Fuel consumption to date, driven quite briskly is a healthy 25/26 m.p.g. but I do miss the overdrive of the Scimitar, which at 3000 r.p.m. in o/d top gave a road speed of 90 m.p.h. with fuel consumption averaging out over some 30,000 miles at between 27/28 m.p.g. Make no mistake, the Scimitar is a very fine car but at something over £5,000 is now mom than the new Rover 3500 and [have my doubts as to whether it is worth the extra.

Incidentally, I was delighted to read the Editor’s report on the Rover 3500—my comments in my letter to you in February 1975 still apply!

Lopcombe Corner P. G. Tilsley

An uncle Rover

Sir,

In the photo preceding your appreciation of the Rover New 3500 in November. I was pleased to see beside the new vehicle a 1960(P4 Series) Rover, of which I possess a “twin”.

A minor lapsus lingual says in the caption three generations, as I am sure W.E. would not wish to exclude either the P5 or P6 series which come between. Both the latter are nice comfortable cars, in which I have travelled many thousands of enjoyable miles, sometimes as driver, by courtesy of friends who have owned them.

But my allegiance is to the P4, having done all my own motoring since 1955 in two of this series—first in a “60” which I had for 12 years and 66,000 miles, and I now drive car number two, the “100”. Having been retired for some years, my annual mileage has latterly been pretty small, and the “100” has not quite clocked 40,000 miles. Still, over 100,000 miles—comfortable and reasonably swift ones—in 2 vehicles in 21 years is not bad.

The “60” was in excellent shape when I parted with it, and the “100” shows so little sign of deterioration that kind friends have assured me that it “will see me out.”

I have a minor bone to pick with Motor Sport on your use of the mildly pejorative Auntie Rover (with her long skirts etc.) for the P4 Series. After all the “100” with acceleration of 0-50 in 12 secs., and a maximum of 95 m.p.h. (as recorded in contemporary road tests) is still adequate for quite fast averages when touring—in fact the “100” is much more like a G.T. car than scores which assume the title.

With power assisted disc/drum brakes, overdrive and a six-in-line 7 bearing crankshaft IOE engine with roller type cam followers the earls one of great refinement. The modernisms which I miss are a heated rear window, and through draught ventilation. I believe the “100” to be the best of the P4 series, as the “95” and “110” lack the aluminium bodywork, while the “80” has not the smoothness of the sixes. I think therefore the “100” at least should qualify as an Uncle Rover, though I prefer a new classification PWWTT or Post World War Two Throughbred.

W.B.’s account of the Rover New 3500 suggests something of outstanding attraction, and in the event of a lucky strike coming my way, such as a good Premium Bond win, I shall acquire one, and offer the “100” to the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu, con amore, where I might hope it would find honourable retirement.

London S .W.14 R. L. GOVETT

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