... and Japanese Integrity

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Honda’s Integra fills a vital gap in its model range. It’s a pleasantly styled, competent car without being a class leader. Some of the components are already familiar, like the transversely mounted four cylinder, sohc, 12 valve, 1488cc engine which gives 84 bhp at 6,000 rpm and 93 lb ft torque at 3,750 rpm.

Performance is quite fair, with a top speed of 104 mph and a 0-60 mph time of 11.3 seconds. While it has no sporting pretensions at all, it will achieve decent A to B times and is a relaxing motorway car for it will maintain a high cruising speed with low noise levels. The driving position is very comfortable and one can put in a lot of mileage without fatigue. I got a fraction better than 30 mpg overall.

The exterior is well finished with a good standard of panel fit while the interior is smart and roomy and is on a par with its rivals so far as equipment is concerned. The rear seats split for extra luggage capacity and the Integra’s ergonomics are up to Honda’s usual high standard.

The unassisted rack and pinion steering and the ventilated disc/drum brake system are likewise on a par with its rivals, that is to say effective without being extraordinary. At £7,150 it is competitively priced.

Like the Civic eries, the Integra has lower wishbone, torsion bar and struts front suspension at the front with, at the rear, beam axle located by trailing arms, a Panhard rod and coil springs. It handles competently though is weak on turn-in and when pressed hard it understeers too much for this driver’s taste.

On the whole, its a well made and finished car which should be on the shopping list of anyone looking at a medium-sized car. It’s the sort of sound basis which makes us look forward to the new performance version which has a 125 bhp 16-valve engine. ML