That Talbot

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Sir,

I refer to your article “Elusive Talbot. In 1964 the l Mech E arranged a symposium on ‘The Design of Small Engines’. In the discussion following the reading of the papers, Roesch took the opportunity, as he often did on these occasions, of relating his pioneering work at Talbot. His contribution, much of which was not strictly relevant to the subject, included a description of his modified 10/23 engine together with the section drawing which you reproduced in your article. Roesch stated that a single 35mm carburettor was fitted but made no mention of the mysterious blower/fan fitted to the nose of the crankshaft. As you imply, a centrifugal device running at crankshaft speed could not possibly produce any useful boost, even if the rotor and casing were correctly shaped which they were clearly not. One can only conclude that it had something to do with the cooling. It is faintly reminiscent of the flywheel fan on the 14/45 Talbot. Roesch gave the maximum speed attained, presumably running light, as 7650rpm. It is surprising that Blight says the engine had a two-bearing crank, when the drawing clearly shows a centre bearing.

I have never really believed the claim of 70bhp for the 1923 200-mile race Alvis, for two reasons. Firstly, because the 1924 engine, which had larger ports and a c r raised from 6.2 to 6.6;1, was said to develop “50 to 60bh” – vide “The History of Brooklands” p136. Secondly, because 70bhp at 4400rpm represents a bmep of 138Ib/sq in, an impossibly high figure for a single carburettor engine with a c r of 6.2;1, bearing in mind also that this is the bmep at peak power and not the peak bmep. For comparison, the bmep of the Roesch engine works out at 1131b/sq in. One might add that the speed of Harvey’s car compared with that of Joyce’s AC did not reflect a power advantage of 15bhp.

A Archdale,
Kings Lynn, Norfolk.

You may also like

Related products