Bill Boddy

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Veteran to classic

The Lakeland Trial

This event is usually memorable as the tough contest that ends the VSCC trialling year, but the dry period of 1995 rather changed things, on November 11 , when 98 drivers of pre-war cars set off to try their luck. Fifteen had penalised themselves 20 points each before even starting, having brought their trials steeds on trailers; Simon Seymour was unlucky here, his A7, its engine nicely fettled with proper new piston rings, etc, displaying clutch withdrawal problems when lowered to the ground.

The trial involved 13 sections, with enchanting names like Prickly, Thirlby’s Folly, Sale Fell, Swinside, Darling Howe, Widown Hause and Buttermere, to remind one that this was Lake District territory. Usually the high-rise and steepness of Drumhouse is the major obstacle but this time 40 drivers managed top marks here.

The problem section was Swinside, topped by only 10 competitors, with 63 cars failing to score a mark between them. In contrast, most of the other sections were fairly easy, everyone getting a maximum 20 points on Spout Force except for J Fort (12), D Oldham (8), L Murray (13), P Mace (3), A Saggerson (5), M Gleeson (8), I Meeks (7) and Ben Collings in the Bentley (9). But some were in trouble very early on, like G Winder, and some, although not classed as non-starters, never appeared, and Rides missed eight sections. When the results were worked out it was seen that the joint winners of the Bridge Trophy for best performance in Class One were Henry Stringer (1933 A7) and Patrick Blakeney-Edwards (1929 Frazer Nash), with 254 points each, and that Robin HarcourtSmith was best in Class Two with his Alvis Silver Eagle, with a score of 208 points, one more than Baxter achieved with his 1928 Chrysler. The Roy Paterson Cup went to Phil Evans (1928 Austin). First-Class Awards: H Stringer (A7), P Blakeney-Edwards (Frazer Nash), I Baxter (A7), S Gordon (A7), P Lonhurst (Riley), B Clarke (A7), I Flann (A7), R Harcourt-Smith (Alvis), S Baxter (Chrysler); Second-Class Awards: K Hill (Crouch-Helix), T Bradley (A7), B Gray (A7-IAP), I Williamson (MG), Jane Tomlinson (A7), I Blackburn (Singer), R Reed (A7), I Percival (Bentley), T Jones (30/98), H Hickling (1917 Dodge), M Telford (Ford), P Tebbett (Riley), A Goding (Morris). Third-Class Awards: M Johnson (Bugatti), S Welsh (A7), L Murray (Frazer Nash), N Plevin (A7), M Joseland (Frazer Nash), R Low (A7), D Saxl (Riley), B Collings (Bentley), J Diffey (30/98). WB

A Riley reunion

Stephen R Southall tells us how he was reacquainted recently with his very first car. He is a well-known VSCC member with his 1920 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost “Wendy”. for which Motor Sport took some acceleration figures at Shobdon Aerodrome many years ago. However, one never forgets one’s first car, in Mr Southall’s case a Riley Nine Gamecock which he bought in 1936 for £45 when he was just 18 years old. As young enthusiasts do, he treated the Riley hard, using it as regular transport and for trials, etc. The compression ratio was raised by fitting special pistons, to around 7.5:1, after which the engine would only function properly on Discol alcohol petrol. On the first run to a North Wales rally, this stopped the Riley when the Discol ate the shellac off the SU petrol pump.

I remember the Riley Gamecock, having suffered many all-night runs to motoring events in the late James Brymer’s example, which he drove in open-necked shirt, hood down, while I snuggled into my leather coat, newspaper on the worn floorboards intended to reduce the wintry draught. . . Brymer, a noted motoring photographer, had driven a Riley Nine Monaco saloon and other cars before this, in MCC trials. He no doubt went over to the Gamecock because the capacious boot was useful for accommodating cameras, etc. But this was a rather unusual model for Riley to introduce, because most customers either wanted a four-seater or at least a dickey-seat on their two-seaters.

To revert to Mr Southall’s car, it was used for many trials, with his brother Chris Southall, later to become a noted 30/98 Vauxhall and veteran De Dion exponent, as his passenger. Many first-class awards were won in events such as SUNBAC, Hagley & DLCC and other competitions and Mr Southall still has the replica of the Riley CC’s George Shepherd Trophy which he won in 1938. So when he heard through a casual conversation with a Riley MC member and a telephone call the next day, that “his” Riley Gamecock is now owned by Ian Lavery in Stockton-on Tees, he was off to Yorkshire from Herefordshire the day after to become reacquainted with it. He found the Riley about to be overhauled, so minus its radiator. But sitting in it once more he was able to relive something of the speed trials, mud trials and club racing for which he had used the car, a great tribute to Victor Riley, says Mr Southall. WB

You may also like

Related products