Collage of art & design

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

149

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

158

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

Current page

186

Current page

187

Current page

188

A new Ferrari exhibition pays tribute to a master of Italian automotive styling. The late Sergio Pininfarina was never afraid to experiment with both function and unforgettable form

By Damien Smith

The night before the opening of ‘The great Ferraris of Sergio Pininfarina’ exhibition in Maranello, Luca di Montezemolo launched his political manifesto for social change in Italy. The Ferrari president plays down his aspirations to become a leader of greater significance beyond the running of a humble car company, but since he is a high-profile and popular national figure, such declarations from his Italia Futura ‘think tank’ are taken seriously in a country still in recovery from the last days of Prime Minister Berlusconi.

But at the Museo Ferrari, di Montezemolo batted away journalists’ questions on politics. He claimed he was here to talk only about cars, and pay tribute to one of the great figures of automotive design.

Still, it is true that Sergio Pininfarina, who died earlier this year aged 85, fitted the template of what di Montezemolo’s ‘think tank’ believes Italy needs right now: that is, entrepreneurs who make a greater contribution to their country beyond their own interests. As his company produced some of the most beautiful cars ever seen, Pininfarina also took his place in public life as an active politician. That fact surely won’t have been lost on Ferrari’s self-aware, modern-day president.

Sergio’s son, Paolo, joined di Montezemolo and Piero Ferrari at the launch of the new exhibition. “It describes my father as a designer, as an engineer, as an entrepreneur and more than all, as a man,” he said. “This exhibition is the life of my father.” The design house was founded in 1930 by Paolo’s grandfather, Battista Tinin’ Farina, and the company’s defining relationship with Ferrari was forged in ’52. The collaboration has resulted in more than 100 of the most beloved models in the world of motoring, and 22 of them are on show in this collection at Ferrari’s official museum in Maranello. They include wonderful experimental designs that sit among the classic road and race selection, and we present the most eye-catching here.

Di Montezemolo paid tribute to the “team effort” that existed between the Turin coachbuilder and the Modena powerhouse, describing each model as “pieces of art”. The president has a point: these automotive sculptures, created to inspire innovation and of course to be driven hard, transcended their original intentions long ago.

The exhibition runs until January 7, 2013. The Museo Ferrari is open seven days a week from 9.30am to 6pm, except Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. Go to www.museoferrari.com for more information.

*

1968 P6

P for ‘prototype’ and spawned from the legendary P3 and P4 sports-racing cars. One of two concepts (P5 now resides in Japan), its influence on 1970s production jewels the BB and 308 GTB can be seen in that wedge nose and those fighter-plane air scoops.

*

1970 Modulo

Inspired by Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, this mid-engined craft cocks a snook at all convention. As for functionality, what place does that have in an obsession to uncover the automobile’s ‘ideal form’? Wall-mounted wooden buck shows pride in traditional craftsmanship.

*

1969 Sigma

Safety was still a dirty word for some in Formula 1, but not for Sergio Pininfarina. This futuristic Grand Prix `monoposto’ was a collaborative result with Revue Automobile and carries features that are standard today, but were groundbreaking at the time, including multi-layer fuel tanks, a multi-point safety harness, wrap-around bodywork for extra protection and to stop wheels interlocking, and onboard fire extinguishers. It even features a moveable mid-wing. Just imagine how striking it would have looked in Ferrari red.

*

1980 Pinin

What should Pininfarina do to celebrate Ferrari’s 50th anniversary? Build a `quattro porte’ saloon powered by a V12, of course! A four-door first for the Prancing Horse, it didn’t catch on. But the single-frame front grill, flush glass windows and sleek tapered tail would be seen again. It could have seen the light of day beyond this prototype, had Enzo Ferrari himself not put a halt to the madness.

*

1989 Mythos

This one has dated. It’s post-Enzo late 1980s excess at its best — or worst depending on your point of view. The Testa Rossa, immortalised in white by TV cop show Miami Vice, provided the platform, and you can tell. Although its imposing rear is more bullish Lamborghini than equine Ferrari.

*

308 GTS

Ferrari red has turned to an odd orange, but the significance of this particular example of a classic design will never fade. This was Gilles Villeneuve’s car, in which he set a record that is unlikely ever to be broken. It was in this 308 that he made the fabled run from Monte Carlo to Maranello — that’s 432km (268 miles) — in an astounding 2hr 25mins.

*

Enzo in his office

A startling recreation, especially when you’re not expecting it (the first glimpse of the waxwork made us jump on our visit). It’s based on the Old Man’s famous office in the house at Fiorano.

*

1967 330 GTC Coupé Speciale

A favourite of Sergio Pininfarina, this unique version is claimed to have once been the property of Lilian, Princess de Rethy of Belgium. Its Dino parentage is obvious.

You may also like

Related products