Books 2

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Current page

96

Current page

97

Current page

98

Current page

99

Current page

100

Current page

101

Current page

102

Current page

103

Current page

104

Current page

105

Current page

106

Current page

107

Current page

108

Current page

109

Current page

110

Current page

111

Current page

112

Current page

113

Current page

114

Current page

115

Current page

116

Current page

117

Current page

118

Current page

119

Current page

120

Current page

121

Current page

122

Current page

123

Current page

124

Current page

125

Current page

126

Current page

127

Current page

128

Current page

129

Current page

130

Current page

131

Current page

132

Current page

133

Current page

134

Current page

135

Current page

136

Current page

137

Current page

138

Current page

139

Current page

140

Current page

141

Current page

142

Current page

143

Current page

144

Current page

145

Current page

146

Current page

147

Current page

148

Current page

148

Current page

150

Current page

151

Current page

152

Current page

153

Current page

154

Current page

155

Current page

156

Current page

157

Current page

157

Current page

159

Current page

160

Current page

161

Current page

162

Current page

163

Current page

164

Current page

165

Current page

166

Current page

167

Current page

168

Current page

169

Current page

170

Current page

171

Current page

172

Current page

173

Current page

174

Current page

175

Current page

176

Current page

177

Current page

178

Current page

179

Current page

180

Current page

181

Current page

182

Current page

183

Current page

184

Current page

185

GRID.

Codemasters,
£40. PS4, Xbox, PC

Codemasters revisits the GRID series with its newest release after stellar entries to the F1 and DiRT series.

The road racer’s last outing was back in 2014 with GRID: Autosport, but the 2019 revival aims to provide players with an arcade style with a route to more sim-focused sensations.

You begin a career that spans several categories of motor racing ranging from touring cars to Can-Am, with the aim of working your way through the ranks. So far so straightforward. In your way stand more than 400 AI drivers, each supposedly with their own on-track personalities, although this feature falls rather flat as you discover very little discernible difference in how each driver races, aside from your rival – one driver in the field marked out as your target to beat in that event.

In terms of the playing style, the game does suffer from a lack of feel and feedback in any car you might be driving, which is especially disappointing given how brilliant the latest DiRT titles have been in this area.

Codemasters has already promised post-launch downloadable content, but the bare-bones nature and lack of selection in terms of tracks leaves a rather noticeable hole once you have completed your first few dozen events. Only a handful of real-life venues are included and the rest of the offerings don’t really add much depth.

The game launches with little over a year left of the current generation of consoles, with the PS5 and new Xbox set for launch next year. Despite this, the game lacks a level of graphical fidelity one might expect from a release at the end of the current console life cycle. Beyond being fairly pretty in wet weather conditions, the game often struggles to reach the highs of other titles.

Multiplayer is a step forward, however, with the rapid-fire events keeping you engaged as you race others online in a variety of different race types.

Where GRID is let down the most though is its indecision in pursuing the arcade style that defined its earlier entries, and its ‘proper’ motor sport direction.

The game is at its absolute best when it behaves like a fully-fledged arcade racer, but those looking for its sim aspects to shine through will be disappointed that the choice between the two styles is not really obvious. Driver aids make little difference to the handling of the cars across the board.

Once you have seen the first hour, there is not much beyond that to keep you engaged, resulting in a safe but rather  unspectacular entry to the GRID series.


MINI 60 Years

Giles Chapman, Published by Motorbooks, £25
ISBN: 978-0-7603-6399-7

What more is there to say about the Mini marque that hasn’t been said, written, filmed, spoken about or driven to victory on the Monte Carlo Rally?

As it turns out, not a lot. With the world’s most famous little car turning 60 in 2019 it’s prompted a flood of cash-in literary titles. And you get the sense that Giles Chapman knows this, so instead has opted to create a compendium of all things Mini, covering some topics in depth and some in a single page. There are redeeming features, such as the design, images and run-downs of the limited editions and downright bizarre one-offs. It’s no work of historical reference, and is therefore more
of a stocking filler for a Mini fan. RL


DB4 GT Continuation: History in the making

James Page, Published by Porter Press, £40.
ISBN 978-1-907085-71-0

With Aston Martin’s Heritage division a growing force in the brand’s armoury, and with the first examples of its gorgeous DB4 Zagato continuation rolling off the production line, this book is a timely offering.

Despite the title being centred around the continuation models, author James Page offers the full story of the lightweight hard-top GT model – from its inception and launch in 1959 through to its on-track success and eventual end of production in 1963.

With the back story covered in intricate detail, and with a nice collection of period imagery and collated race results, Page moves on to the 2016-17 Heritage project, which aimed to build the final 25 GTs to compliment the original 75 examples.

Page has great access to the designers, engineers and staff who helped re-create one of Aston’s most famous cars. The imagery across the second half is a tad repetitive, with a few too many shots of the same one car driving about. But if you’re a fan of the DB4 GT, it’s a worthy buy. RL

 

You may also like

Related products