The Late Captain Toop

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Sportsmen in general will regret the loss of a good friend to motor racing by the death of Capt. J. M. Toop, who was killed whilst driving a Peugeot at the Whit-Monday Meeting at Brooklands. Those who have taken to the sport since the war will not have a very close acquaintance of his character and ability, for most of his competitive work was done in pre-war days, when he raced Sunbeam and Peugeot cars with a measure of success.

Perhaps the best of his performances was the winning of the Benzol Cup in 1913. Soon after that he went on active service in the East, and it was only last year he returned and took up his residence at Byfleet Naturally the fascination of the track was irresistible.

He had been round once or twice in practice spins, but this was the first time in post-war days that he had competed in a race. He was extremely keen to win it, and it is probable that but for the accident would have succeeded, for he was about to pass the leader at the time of the disaster.

Mr. Brocklebank, the owner of the Peugeot which Capt. Toop was driving, had originally intended to take it through himself, but after handing over the driving wheel, Mr. Brocklebank took the passenger seat and actually rode to the starting point. To assist Capt. Toop in his effort to win the race, Mr. Brocklebank, however, vacated the seat so as to add to the speed of the car.

Capt. Toop was a bachelor of about middle age. He was a fine character, and was loved and respected by a large circle of motoring friends.

Mr. Herbert le Vack, riding his big J. A. P. engined Brough Superior, at Senart, in France, has succeeded in breaking the world’s record set up by Mr. Temple’s 113 m.p.h., having attained the truly wonderful speed of 114.84 m.p.h.

To attain such a speed on a motor cycle is, of itself, a. remarkably fine achievement; but additional admiration Is won by this intrepid rider, in this instance, for having so triumphed on a wet road across which there swept a 50 m.p.h. gale.