THE PROGRESS OF DIRT

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THE PROGRESS OF DIRT—continued from page 299.

Phillips (well-known at Brooklands) and Gus Kuhn: The standard of riding at this track is much more uniform and, apart from these three, none seems to be very much better than his rivals.

Another big concern who have not really started work yet are southern Speedways, who run, or will run, meetings at the Crystal I alace, Brighton and Lournemouth among other places. Their Australians include Charlie DatEon and Sig Echlam, while the irrepressible Fay Taylour has shown that women or, at least that she, can do as well as most men.

Dirt Track Speedways have no track in London yet, but their riders have appeared at several of the other tracks by arrangement. However, they have held meetings at Glasgow, Fdinburgh and Paris, where “Sprouts,” St. George and Paddy Dean perform well, while h or Creek (England) and C. Williams (Wales) have attained astonishing proficiency.

Lastly, we have Greenford, which is in a class by itself ; it is a half-mile track and speeds are much higher ; the surface is very tricky and varies from day to day. The organisers are hampered by the locality of the track, which is difficult to reach, and they, perhaps, cannot yet afford to spend much money on improving the surface. As a track for riders (who should be the people who matter) Greenford is excellent sport. The whole atmosphere is less circus-like and more sporting, most of the riders being private owners. The star rider at present is Frank Dobson, whose record has only just been beaten by the lone-handed American, Art. Pedlar, who put up a sensational ride on his Indian.

Other consistent winners are L. Dallimore who never, never slides but tears round the extreme outside edge, and the Sinclair brothers who provoke the most hectic broadsides until the “shifting sands” unseat them. Jimmie Sloman also consistently belies his name, either on an ancient A.J .S. or a New Hudson.

All the above mentioned tracks continue to draw good crowds, who seem to be intensely enthusiastic, which fact is refreshing, in that it shows that, for a time at least, Britishers can en:oy a sport which is entirely free from the artificial stimulus of betting.

THE ALGERIAN GRAND PRIX.

The Algerian Grand Prix, which took place on 6th May, over the Staonele circuit, provided yet another v:ctory for Bugatti, the successful driver on this occasion being Lehonx. The race was for a distance of 220 miles, and Lehonx’s average speed was 57.7 m.p.h. Besides the Bugattis, the most formidable cars were the Amilcars. Meyer (Bugatti) took the lead at the outset, hotly pursued by Lehonx, who soon overtook him. The duel between the two Bugattis continued hotly until Meyer retired on the 37th lap. Thereafter Lehonx was never threatened, and the final result was as follows :

1. Leonx (Bugatti).

2. Cloitre (Minicar).

3. Dupont (Amilcar).

4. Seyfried (Salmson).

5. Mme. Peltzer (Bugatti).

The touring car race, held on the previous day, over the same course, was won by Boyriven on a 2-litre Omega-Six.