THE SPORT AFLOAT

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64

THE SPORT AFLoAT

AS we go to press the three-days International meeting is being run off at the Welsh Harp, where entrants are competing for the Duke of York’s Trophy and for other big prizes. The decision to use Hendon as a venue of the meeting instead of the Thames was arrived at after careful consideration on the part of the organisers, who have been able to arrange a programme which is the most representative held in this country. At one time, through the endeavours of Mr. Arthur Bray, of the International Racing Committee, and his associates, it was hoped that the Port of London Authority would waive their rule which bars outboard racing on the Thames, but the latter have remained adamant after a lengthy conference between the two parties. It is mainly due to this that the organisers decided to go to the Welsh Harp.

A New Two-Stroke.

The ‘Villiers Engineering Company, like one or two other manufacturers of two-stroke motor-cycle engines, have now entered the marine field with an interesting little single cylinder unit of 247 c.c. This unit is practically identical with the Villiers motor-cycle engine (except that it is water cooled), and has the usual flywheel magneto and the firm’s own carburettor. The water pump is secured on a neat mounting and is driven by chain from the crankshaft. Although the engine has bore and stroke of only 66 m.m. by 70 m.m., it develops about 1 h.p. at 1,000 r.p.m., and when running at about 3,000 the output is nearly four times this amount.

The Villiers Co. have probably had more experience in building diminutive two-stroke engines than any other firm, and this new type will doubtless have all the qualities of reliability, stamina and economy which its prototypes possess. The manufacturers have not yet decided on the price, but it is believed that the new engine will be marketed at about £18.

” R.R. 50.”

The Rolls-Royce engines in Sir Henry Segrave’s

illfated “Miss England II. ” were, it is stated, largely constructed of the recently-discovered aluminium alloy known as Hidtnninium R.R. 50. Evolved in the Rolls-Royce laboratories, R.R. 50 was one of the secrets of the engines which won the Schneider Trophy for this country last September. Though originally designed to give 875 h.p., each unit was lightened and modified until it delivered nearly

2,000 b.h.p. with a power-weight ratio of 12 oz. b.h.p.— an amazing figure for a water-cooled engine.

The reason is that R.R. 50 is not only lighter and tougher than former aluminum alloys ; it has many times their resistance to fatigue under the stress of heat and prolonged vibration.

An important commercial feature of R.R. 50 is that it is actually cheaper to produce than former alloys— and already, it is stated officially, enquiries from Continental countries have been so numerous and valuable that the licensees (High Duty Alloys, Ltd.) have found it necessary to open an office in Paris to deal with the growing foreign business in the new metal.

A Gosport Development.

Fairlee Motors, who recently started business as boat builders at Porton Launch Works, Gosport, Hants, are now engaged in the production of two types of small craft, both powered with inboard engines.

The first is known as the Fairlee “Midget,” and the power unit installed is the new Turner-Bray engine ; the concern will market this model at an attractive figure. The other boat is a runabout of 18-ft., and is fitted with a Coventry-Victor flat-twin motor. As soon as the first of the type has gone through her tests, Fairlee Motors propose to put her into standardised production.

Another Lone Cruise.

Another lone traveller will start off soon on a world cruise if all his plans turn out satisfactorily. The adventurer this time is Mr. C. L. Murray, and his craft is an ex-P. & 0. lifeboat with a Ford engine. Mr. Murray plans to traverse Europe by means of the waterways, and after reaching the Black Sea he will, by divers routes, reach the Pacific. Mr. Murray is used to solitary travel, and it may be remembered that his most recent exploit was to carry out a 10,000 mile tour all over the Continent on foot and by bicycle.

U.S. Boat Trade.

Some indication of the extraordinary growth of the outboard movement is provided by official figures recently compiled and issued in regard to exports of motor boats, and engines from the U.S.A.

During last March, for example, no less than 1,405 engines (1,129 of which were outboards) were shipped from America, as against only 777 for the corresponding period in 1929.

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