Matters Of Moment, July 1957

Author

admin

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Racing Drivers on Strike

The strike of professional racing drivers over starting-money terms is distinctly unpalatable. Whatever the rights and wrongs of the matter, which is discussed in this issue on pages 385/6 under the heading “Continental Notes,” it seems a great pity for motor racing to be curtailed when, for once, panic safety measures, petrol rationing and politics have not prevented it from taking place.

As we write there is still doubt as to whether the European drivers will start against the Americans in the Monza 500, although it is almost certain that the Italian teams will be at Aintree on July 20th for the European G.P. for which 7,000 guineas prize money is offered, as well as the required starting-money.

If the professionals are acting like professionals it is gratifying to see a high degree of enthusiasm amongst amateur racing drivers. At Silverstone, Goodwood and other circuits club meetings are extremely well attended and vast entries contest fiercely-fought races in which the standard of driving skill has improved enormously in the last half-decade. Vintage and veteran motoring is in full swing and altogether the barometer of amateur motor sport is “set fair.”

Professional racing, on the other hand, suffers not only the set-back of a drivers’ union but the sad demise of our Connaught G.P. team. It is a thousand pities that financial strain has rent asunder and destroyed this British team. It is to be hoped that Vanwall and B.R.M., if the latter’s road holding deficiencies can he overcome, will remain, to “wear the green” in G.P. races. As it is, it would be invidious for the Connaught Supporters’ Club to try to support non-tearn Connaughts and this ill-fated organisation, which got out badges, stamps, a magazine and so forth, but to date has handed none of its members’ contributions to Connaught, should be wound up. After these funds have paid for Connaughts’ appearance at Monaco, as promised, those who contributed have every reason to request the return of the balance of their money.

The demise of Connaught is a heavy blow to British motor-racing prospects. To somewhat alleviate this set-back we have had those resounding victories in sports-car races at Spa and Nurburgring by the Aston Martin DBR1, which has placed this make third at the time of writing in the World’s Sports-Car Championship. Let us hope that by the time this is in print they will have put Le Mans in the David Brown bag.

That leading British driver, Brooks, drove the winning car at Spa and was partnered by Cunningham-Reid at Nurburgring. Another British driver, S. Lewis-Evans, has graduated from the Connaught to the Ferrari team.

So things are not too bleak in British racing, especially as the B.R.D.C./Daily Express Race Meeting at Silverstone is announced for September 14th and the big Oulton Park Race Meeting for October 5th.

So far as ordinary motoring is concerned a few notable new models, like the Wolseley 1,500 and disc-brake Jaguar XK150, point the way to really new British cars at Earls Court in 1958, if not this year. When the little Berkeley was introduced Motor Sport remarked that sales-success would follow competition successes. It has so far appeared mostly at Goodwood, where it has retired rather frequently, but successful participation in competition events is the surest way to publicise a car and we hope that the Wolseley, Jaguar and other new models will be seen in future rallies and races. Meanwhile, as the page overleaf shows, there is an excellent selection of fixtures awaiting your presence as competitor, spectator or official during the pleasant month of July. Amateur motor sport certainly flourishes.

Brooklands’ Golden Jubilee

If Brooklands has been built on and desecrated it hasn’t been forgotten. In its Golden Jubilee year we have had a B.B.C. Television programme devoted to it, publication of Boddy’s comprehensive history on the 50th anniversary of the opening of the famous Motor Course, and on July 6th Vickers-Armstrongs are to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first race meeting at Brooklands by asking the Rt. Hon. Lord Brabazon of Tara, G.B.E., MC., P.C., to unveil a memorial (suggested originally by Whitney Straight) and afterwards lead a parade of many ex-Brooklands cars round the hallowed ground in a 1908 G.P. Austin. This parade, and later individual runs, promise to be memorable. Most or the great Edwardian cars will he present, including the 21-litre Benz, Dr. Pinkerton’s 10-litre Fiat, the 1908 Hutton, Clutton’s 1908 Itala, the 1912 15-litre Lorraine-Dietrich “Vieux Charles Trois,” Pomeroy’s 1914 “Prince Henry” Vauxhall, and the 1913 chain-drive Bugatti “Black Bess.” In addition many other famous Brooklands cars, such as the lap-record Napier-Railton, the 19-litre, Chitty-Bang-Bang II, Don’s Sunbeams, etc., etc., will perform before a distinguished assembly of several thousand guests, including many famous Brooklands drivers. To date more than 40 cars are expected, apart from ex-Brooklands motor-cycles and early aeroplanes. Unfortunately the public cannot be admitted, as Charles Gardner explains in a letter on page 388, but those who happen to be in the Brooklands Road on that day may see some exciting cars arriving and departing.