Veteran - Edwardian - Vintage, July 1960

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A section devoted to old-car matters

A sporting Rolls Royce — On the 50th anniversary of the death in a flying aceidcnt of the Hon. C. S. Rolls see publish this picture, sent to us by a reader, of a sporting 40/50 ” Silver Ghost.” Does it still exist, today ?

The V.S.C.C. Beaulieu Rally (May 22nd)

Rain gave way to sunshine for this annual fixture. The Concours d’Elegance Martini Trophy was won by A. W. Rippon’s 1930 Bugatti. The assembly then moved off to the spaciousness of Beaulieu aerodrome where four mild tests were taken on a disused runway.

An interesting newcomer was A. Baily’s big 1912 Cadillac tourer,. the engine of which, with four separate cylinders, is virtually a 1908 design. It wasn’t Baily’s day, because he had had a puncture en route, had not persuaded the carburetter to give the correct mixture and, as he came up to the first test, had the embarrassment of the steering wheel rim coming off in his hands. Helped by Cyril Mann this was lashed on and this American Edwardian then went very well.

Amongst those who wiggle-woggled extremely well through the first test were Jones in his noisy 14/40 Vauxhall, Marsh in his 1925 Austin Chummy, Robson and Borthwick in two of three very nice Lancia Lambdas present, Tatham who was extremely fast in a very fine 1929 open 4 1/2-litre Bentley, while Barker in his well-known M.G. Tiger looked to have made f.t.d. Sawers managed his 30/98 Vauxhall well and Millar did even better in his even-longer twincant 3-litre Sunbeam, accompanied by the pungent scent of “R” and a slight spit from the carburetters. Gahagan set the tail of his G.P. Bugatti sliding and amongst the p.v.t. entries Wilcock was extremely fast in his S.S.100, which had power aplenty to spin its wheels on take-off.

Charles Mortimer drove a very smart Talbot 105 team car (GO 51), the engine of which sounded a bit out of sorts, Collins tumbled a pylon in hisfamous 1931 Alvis and Knight made up by driving fast a 1930/36 Riley which by no stretch of imagination should be in the V.S.C.C. or qualify as a thoroughbred. Perhaps the Committee has a “thing” about Rileys, for Stoton’s 1934 Riley didn’t look at all thoroughbred to us. After all, they have an excellent Register of their own. And while we are in this mood, we disapproved of Cuff’s 1924 Austin Chummy over which someone had poured lots of yellow paint to match the driver’s pullover and, not content to let it rest there, had fitted a funny bulb horn and screwed a big brass data plate to the side of the body. The little car was obviously bashful about all this and repeatedly stalled its engine, which had to be wound up. A. Clark’s 1928 9/20 Humber was spoilt by having non-original cut-away doors.

Some very skilful handling characterised the garaging test, splendid performances being made by Hayward (Fiat 503), a 1928 model-A Ford tourer on Trade Plates, driven by a lady, de Stills’ neat Austin Chummy, Applebee’s 1923 back-braked Morris-Cowley two-seater, the Barker M.G., Bell’s 1924/26 Lancia Lambda and Gahagan’s Bugatti. Millar stalled the Sunbeam’s engine, Getley took it slowly but ” holed-in-one ” in his Bentley whereas Sawers had to reverse his 30/98, Borthwick’s Lambda Was extremely slick, but Jeffries seemed intent ui breaking his 1929 Lea-Francis’ gearbox, the Cadillac touched a drum, and the rear hubs of Carpenter-Jacob’s 1928 Lea-Francis sounded a little worn. Collis handled his big Sunbeam tourer proficiently and it possessed excellent brakes, perhaps aided by the aluminium paint on the brake drums. Wilcock was again terrific in his SS.

The sport concluded with a forward-reverse test in which cars were called upon to go backwards twice, which is rather cruel to vintage axles. However, although the 14/40 Vauxhall’s axle elonked audibly, a very fine Bentley did its best to shed its front axle and Borthwick showed no consideration for his Lambda’s gearbox, no mechanical calamities resulted and this enjoyable day of vintagery is something to be looked forward to each year.

There is no better break from over-much motor racing than a visit to that typically British institution, the traction-engine rally, which is also usually an occasion for owners of vintage and veteran cars to show off their vehicles to a new cross-section of the public. At the Toe-H rally at Chilcomb Manor near Winchester on May 21st, there was strong support front the latter for the steam engines present, the oldest of which was a 1910 Wallis and Steevens and which included a fine 1916 Foden five-ton -steam lorry. The old cars included a 1925 8/18 Ilumber with rare two-seater body, an even rarer 1926 Galloway, a very sporting 1914 Type AK Delage with Gabriel exhaust whistle, a butcher’s 1924 model-T Ford One-tonner with two-speed axle, a well-kept 1929 Standard Nine with the unusual Tourist’s Coupe body of which only 200 were built, and the ex-Editorial P413 Del.:Imlay-Belleville which, alas, has been brassedup and generally made an exhibition of. Air Chief Marshal Sir Alec Coryton’s 1902 de Dion Houton had very unusual front suspension .comprising Felliptie springs coupled to i-elliptics, and Air Ministry instruments which looked decidedly out of place. There was also an off-white Trojan van and a very rough car we mistook for a Talbot but which was labelled as a Bass. Fun !

* * *

An instance of the reliability of contemporary Edwardian cars was given to us recently by Frank Cheverton, who has loaned his great Coppa Velocita to the Montagu Motor Museum. In 1908 he started a car-hire business in the Isle of Wight and a Speedwell. driven by an ex-coachman, covered 15,000 miles in a year with no trouble other than punctures; the secret being, perhaps, that it was properly serviced every evening. Mr. Cheverton speaks of the excellence of the just pre-I914 Adler, and 12-h.p. Benz cars of the same period. ‘We believe he still retains, in retirement, a two-seater “Prince henry” Vauxhall, an early Benz, and a circa 1900 Panhard-Levassor.

* * *

Which reminds us that seldom has any car caused so much controversy as to its history as the aforesaid has, Which is now such an imposing inmate of the Montagu Motor Museum. Last month we gave its date as 1907 but corrected thiS on another page to 1905. Other jombals have quoted both dates, and Lord Montagu’s own journal has given the engine size as 17 1/2-litres. Some further research shows this car to be a 1907 14-litre ltala and probably the actual car with which (ago° W011 the Coppuineito at Brescia that year. However, there is a ,imilar Rola in Australia for which this latter dab,’ is also made, which all adds zest to the hard tasks of the motoring historian!

• • •

Yet another aspect of the old-car movement is now covered by the versatile Lord Montagu of Beaulieu. who is opening a Public Transport Library at Palace House. It is hoped to open this in the autumn and already In colletion of motor books and W. J. Brunell’s photegraphic library have been bought. The idea is to have a photostat and photographic service available, to publish books, and to issue seholarships to students of motoring history.

• • •

An auction sales of veteran and vintage vehicles will take place at the Montagu Motor Mosconi on July 16th, and for two days prior to this sale the vehicles will be on view in a marquee in the grounds of Palace House. This is described as a sale run by old-car enthusitists.for old-car enthusiasts and may become an annual fixture. Actually it is being run by Southern Counties Car Auctions Ltd., to whom all inquiries should be addressed. They advertise it As the day when ” Old Crooks will come under the hammer At Beaulieu “

• • •

Amongst cars in breakers’ yards we hear of a circa-1926 Star lorry, a partially-complete bulloose Morris Cowley, a complete but dilapidated 9/20 Humber saloon, several vintage Austins and a Trojan van, together with numerous vintage hits and pieces such as a Cubitt radiator, etc. We also bear of a recently-discovered 1922 model SLO4 Standard tourer, and this will be rebuilt if its owner can find a radiator for it. A1926 sleeve-valve Daimler with hearse body, in running order, is in danger of being broken up in London. Letters can be forwarded.

• • •

This year’s well-established Sunbeam M.C.C. Veteran and Vintage Rally takes place on July 24th and terminates at Beaulieu. It is open to anyone owning ears, three-wheelers and motorcycles built prior to 1931, divided into several -classes. Car entries cost 15s. each, teams 5s. extra; the entry list closes on July 12th. Competitors start from a point of their own choice. and arrive at Beaulieu between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., gaining marks for distance up to 50 miles,•age•of driver, and age of vehicle. There will also be a Contours d’Elegance. Details front J. Neave, 87, Northeroft Road, West Ewell, Epsom, Surrey.

• • •

It is particularly appropriate, at a time when Jaguar has absorbed the famous name of Daimler, that the Daimler O.C. and Daimler Register should be taking steps to become a strong, virile Club that will preserve and foster this long-established make. These organisations are liaising closely With the Daimler Apprentices’ M.C. and there are four categories of membership, the D.A.M.C., the Register, the Register Assistance Club for non-owners, and the D.M.C. Membership is, respectively, 7s. 6d. (entry fee 10s.), 2s. 6d., free and 10s. (entry fee for 10s.). There are Club crests and lapel badges already available. The Register is open to owners of Daimlers made prior to 1930 and already it has 44 Daimlers on its books, from 1898 to 1929. ineluding 11 Edwardians and two commercial vehicles. Details of these organisations are obtainable from T. McElligott, Daimler Apprentices Motor Club, c/o The Daimler Co., Ltd Coventry, and it is to be hoped that readers will bring them to the notice of Daimler owners who have not so far joined.

* * *

The Historic Commercial Vehicle Club’s Rally, due to be held at Beaulieu on Whit-Sunday, had to be abandoned due to lack of entries.

* * *

The Trust founded by Lord Montagu to preserve historic vehicles puttl their appurtenances. has been formed, under the title of the Historic Vehicle Trust Ltd. The Secretary is Miss C. M. Roberts, 4, St. Bride Street, London. E.C.4.

* * *

Those who seek a change from vintage car cc ent• pita y care to note that, on July 2nd, the Vintage Motor Cy.le Club will ‘411111011 the Conservative Concours at Ilighbury Park, King’s !tenth, Birmingham (2 p.m.) with a display of vintage motorcycles and that this Club’s Lewis Cup Trial, an event ” steeped in tradition and tilmost a pilgrimage to the menthry of the riders of yesteryear.” to quote the V.M.C.C. journal, and which eaters I’msinglesspeed maehines. will start from Holt Heath, Worcs. on July 10th.

• • •

The latest issue of the Morgan Three-Wheeler Club’s Bulletin ” brings the cheering news that there are still several vintage ” Moggies ” in our midst, new members’ ears including it 1923 o.h.v. Super Sports J.A.P.. a 1928 Aero with o.h.v. through Superior engine and a 1929 s.v. Aero-I.A.P. There is to be a Morgan Rally at Beaulieu on July 31st. The Secretary of the Club is M. Guess. Fiat 3. 31. Heyworth Street, Derby.

* * * 

While road-testing the Ford Taunus in the West Country an Austin Twelve, not later than 1926, with van body, was seen to he imp use by a steam bakery in the hilly district of Beer and a back-braked Dodge, possibly a commercial vehicle chassis, with platform body, was encountered in a farmyard near Beaminster, while at a Hampshire garage a sports 9/20 Rover was for sale.

* * *

July fixtures which will feature vintage cars include the Alton (Staffs) Traction Engine Rally on the 2m113rd, the Old Libertions’ .Association Summer Fair at Gidea Park, Essex, on the 9th. the Watford College Rag Procession on the same day, the Maidenhead Festival of Transport on the 16th/17th, the Rempstpue ‘fraction Engine Rally on the 16th, and the Bath Concours .d’Eleganee on the 30th. We can forward letters to the organisers from those wishing to take part.

• • •

The Bentley D.C. holds its Kensington Gardens Concours on July tbitl, from 12 noon onwards.

* * *

Leonard Russell, Literary Editor of the Sunday Times, believes that he possesses “one of the most comprehensive motoring libraries in private hands in this country,” on which your Editor has the temerity to challenge him, Mr. Russell goes on to make the astonishing statenamt that he does not read these books or understand the first thing about cars…. He endorses his lack of understanding of cars by writing a column for his paper all about those he has broken. A Buckingham he bought for £80 in 1926 from a dealer in the Upper Richmond Road had to be sold for £12 10s. and two bound volumes of The Autocar, after “something went wrong in the back-axle” necessitating driving home in reverse — curious, this; as the gearbox wasn’t in the back-axle! Next Mr. Russell paid £110 for a Super Sports A.B.C., which he. drove, lightless, into a parked lorry. Undaunted, he tells us how he bought a secondhand 5 c.v. Citroen cloverleaf which soon shed its n/s, front wheel, which “snapped clean away.” Poor Mr. Russell! In 1951 he had it new convertible which six months later went out of production and for which he has required three new gearboxes since 1956. It’s rather surprising, surely, that the Sunday Times lets this self-styled “Ishmael of the Motor-Car” review motoring books. . . .

* * * 

The programme at the. M.G. Car Club’s Silverstone meeting on June 4th ineluded it parade organised by the Bullnose Morris Club to show the development id the Bullnose Morris into the Bullnose and later flat-radiator M.G.s. Eighteen cars took part iu the parade; ten Ihullnose Morrises ranging front 1922 to 1926; three Bullnose M.G..s; and five post-13ullnose (M-type Midget, two Mark IV, a Mark 111 Six and a Mark I Speed Model). The three Bullnose M.G.s are believed to be the only remaining examples of their type in the country. They are the 1925 Kintboy Special, FC 7900. owned by the M.G. Car Company, the 1926 two-seater from the Montagu Museum, and the ex-Fernihough 1926 four-seater owned jointly by Lytton Jarman and Robin Barraclough.

* * *

On June 10th there was a gathering of Vintage M.C. enthusiasts at the West Meon lint, Hants, organised by Lt. John Guild, R.N. Cars present included six Mark I Speed Models, Chris Barker’s immaculate Mark III and the ex-Fernihough 14/28 Bullnose fourseater, in which Jarman and Barraclough did a round trip of 260 miles to attend the meeting. Also present were several 18/80 owners who are still in the process of restoring their cars, and therefore had to turn up in other vehieles. Technical information and spares were Swapped with great enthusiasm, and it is hoped that further meetings will he arranged in the near future. Owners of M.G. 18/80 models. in particular, are invited to contact Patrick Tennant, ” Mariners,” Boshain Hoe, Sussex.

• • •

In aid of the first Cheshire Home for Incurables in Somerset, the Bath Concour d’ Elegance will be held at the Recreation Ground, Bath, on July 30th, and is open to veteran, Edwardian and vintage Cars, the last named divided into saloons and Open models, and p.v.t. ears. The entry fee is 10s. per car. Numerous trophies will be awarded, and entry forms for this deserving event are obtainable from T. Hooper Jones, Wynsrucet, liorsecombe Brow, Con:the Down, Bath.

* * * 

A reader is restoring a 1928 Triumph Super Seven coupe and requires a handbook, information, and if possible a similar car as a source of spares. Letters can he forwarded.

• • •

Toe-H are holding a Traction Engine Rally, with vintage and veteran car support, at Dorchester on July 9th.

• • •

Discoveries this month include a 1920 Daimler limousine, described as “line but forlorn,” which apparently has six new be. tyres, and in the same yard in Worcestershire the remains of a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost chassis and a complete but dilapidated 1928 Essex, the last named not for sale. We also hear of a 1922 Overland tourer, some parts of a 1902 de Dion and inodel-T Ford, together with some early lamps, and what are thought to be a 1925 Rover and a 1904 Darracq, the last two possibly for sale in Sussex. In the same county a 1927 Buick and a vintage M.G. were recently broken up.

Vintage Postbag 

Sir, 

I can add something to Mr. Radford’s letter on page 342 of May issue of Motor Sport. I had a 1924 H.E. sports two-seater. The engine was 13-h.p., 72.5 x 120; thermo syphon with impeller cooling; pressure feed lubrication to main bearings and pump to trough; coil or magneto; Solex; four forward speeds; multiple dry plate clutch; spiral bevel final drive; wire wheels; 815 x 105 tyres; front wheel brakes; C.A.V.; dynamo lighting and electric starter; 12-volt; price £740.

There were slight differences in the four-seater, curiously enough. It had Zenith carburetter; worm final drive; 9 ft. 6 in. wheelbase against 9 ft. 9 in. of two-seater; 6-volt lighting; price £620.

The three-seater specification was otherwise as that of the fourseater and the rriee was 1;615. Above details are from 1923 Show catalogue.

I am, Yours, etc.,

Bristol. C. P. KETCHLEY.

* * *

Sir,

You may be interested in the enclosed picture Of a 1926 WillysKnight tourer which was in fay family from 1926 to 1937. The following information from memory may be of interest. The car Was imported in what we call now C.K.D. form, I believe front Willys Overland Inc. U.S.A. and assembled by a concern called, if I remember correctly, Willys,Ovenand-Crossley somewhere in Manchester. I believe Heaton Chapel or it may have been Trafford Park. In 1926 two sizes were marketed, the standard ” 6,” 20.9-h,p. R.A.C. rating and the Great Six about 25.6 R.A.C. rating.

The car in the picture is the smaller variety, the 20.9 six-cylinder car. As shown in touring form the purchase price was £395, whilst the saloon version was £495.

During the eleven years the car gave no trouble except that on one occasion sleeve bearings had to be renewed. Oil consumption, which never varied, was 200 miles to a pint. The brakes were interesting. The rear brakes were external, contracting onto the drum, whilst the front brakes were of the internal expanding type. The car registration number is or was TT 9349 and it was sold to Bests Garage of Littleham Cross, Exmouth, in December, 1936 or Jantthry, 1937, who, I think, resold it to a farmer, but I have never heard of it since. The colour was a very attractive grey with black mudguards and a waistband of black/red/black which can just he discerned in the photograph, which was taken at Oreombe Point, Exmouth.

The Willys-Kniglat was in 1926 a great joy to drive. Compared to British vehicles of the same price at the time it had notch more power and its top gear performance on hills outstripped al most anything in a comparable price class and many cars of a higher price. I am, Yours, etc.,

Wisborough Green. M. GARDEN.

*  * *

Sir,

Does no one in England love those delightful. honestly made and faithful machines, the model-A Fords?

I would like to form .an owners’ club and would be pleased to hear from owners who might be interested.

I own two model A town sedans and belong to a Restorers Club in the U.S.A. Just about every spare can be hod, because of the five million built, ahnost one million are estimated to be still running.

By the way, I bought a VW some years ago on the advice of the Editor, Motor Sport, and finished up owning five of them. I’ve just followed his advice again and bought an N.S.U. Hope you are right again!

Always a faithful follower of Motor sport.

I am, Yours, etc.,

T. J. M. Donson.

[Letter from interested owners of model-A Fords can be forwarded. —ED,]

* * *

Sir,

I read with interest Mr. R. P. Stevens letter concerning a possible reason for the sudden demise of the steam car prior to World War I.

In order to try and verify the story told by Mr. Stevens I consulted the records at the Patent Office but could find no patents taken out during the period 1890-1914, in the name of Doble or any similiar name, which related to steam cars or their controls. patents may .,owever have been taken out in another name, but This would a apear to contradict what Mr. Stevens was told. The this seems unlikelyely. There may also have been patents earlier than 1890, but these could not have prevented a person making the steam car since such patents would have expired long before 1914.

One often hears of inventions which have supposedly been stifled in the manner described hut it is very rarely that proof of such actions being carried out has been found.

It may interest Mr. Stevens to know that such -an oceurrence could not. happen under present Patent Law since provisions are included whereby any interested person can Obtain a eompulsory licence on reasonable teems under any patent, if he can show that the proprietor of the patent is not Working the invention covered by it.

I am, Yours. etc.,

Teddington. A. G. H. Burnington.

* * *

Sir,

In reply to R. P. Steven’s letter. the story about Mr. Doble is not true. Abner Doble asfar as I know still lives in Santa Rosa, California, and as for selling patents to Rockefeller that does not make sense. The Doble Company was taken over by the Besler -Corporation. Wm. Besler used the “know how” of the old Doble works (for whom he had worked) to become the only man I know who ever built and flew a steam aeroplane,

The ” know bow ” to design an automotive-steam engine is still around. For an example of what can be done with small steam engines. see page 451 of ” Shipbuilding and Shipping Record .” April 7 th. 1960.

The difficulty of the noble steam car was that it Cost £10 900 te build and was sold for only £3,000.

I am, Yours. etc.,

Bredem ROBERT D. PARSONS.

* * *

Sir,

The Alvis Register’s policy of refusing to admit to membership those not owning cars which conform to the original specification is probably responsible for the letter signed by “Leptis Europaens” in your June issue.

For eleven years the Register admitted to membership anyone owning an Alvis built during the years covered by the Register, i.e., 1020 to 1932, irrespective of coachwork or other modifications. Virtually all these owners, on joining, expressed the desire and intention of ” restoring to original specification.” As a result the Register has a quite remarkable collection of ” home-brews ” and much-modified ears among the 800-odd Alvis on its records. So much so, in fact, that for the past twelve months prospective members have been asked to furnish photographs where the tars are not already known to the Register, before being admitted to membership, with the direct object of excluding undesirable examples. To date there have been twelve such rejections.

The principal object of the Register is preservation. Restoration is very nice but how many people do the job properly ? In the experience of the A.R. the only restorations properly undertaken and fulfilled have been carried out by overseas members. I ant referring to work which requires a completely new body. If a prospective member has an Alvis which conforms to our requirements but needs hard work to make it respectable and the owner clearly indicates his intention to do this, then We welcome him as a meinber. The car which already has a soundly-built but home-made body is less likely to be taken off the road to have a genuine replica body fitted. It has not happened yet and I should be very surprised if it does. In the eyes of the Register. such a car is not a true vintage specimen.

The attitude of the Register is reflected by the V.S.C.C. in their recently introduced ” purity ” campaign.

I am, Yours, etc., NORMAN H. JOHNSON Buckhurst Hill. Hon. Registrar, The Alvis Register. I

[Our correspondent’s complaint was that without being permitted to join an appropriate Club be will be unable to obtain data requited for restoring his car. Wouldn’t the solution he to take such owners in for a probationary period, excluding them later if they have not improved their cars – Ed]

* * *

Sir,

Mr. Coverdale is the latest of those who have defended the Model J Duesenberg against what I have written about it in the ” Vintage Motor Car and later in the ” Vintage Pocket Book.” The curious thing is that Mr. Coverdale does nothing to refute my criticism. Everyone agrees that the “J ” is beautifully made and has a superb engine, but these merits are quite discounted by lethal understeer and the handling qualities of a hippopotamus (well, I’ve never driven a hippo, to he truthful, but that’s my guess). In fact, my closing remark in the ” Vintage Pocket Book ” is absolutely justified : ” It seems doubtful, anyway, if it was quite as good as it set out to be.”

I am, Yours, etc..

London, S.W.I. CECIL CLUTTON.

* * *

Sir,

Motor Sport was of even greater interest to me this month for the article on the Belsize Bradshaw. I should say at once that I am no relation to the other Mr. Chapman.

I bought my car in London in about 1928 for the sum of £27 10s. and drove it home at night in the rain. The dynamo was driven from the prop.-shaft. thus the greater the road speed the more the juice available for the lights. The battery was down and I was forced to tuck in behind other cars until they lost Inc and then wait until another suitable one came along and run for a few miles behind that; en route the hood split and I arrived back in Bath sitting in a pool of water.

The car was good fun but far front perfect. Always a bad starter. partly due to the .characteristies of the 90′ magneto, the oil consumption was high, some dribbling out of the exhaust pipe and the rest forming a jelly round the cylinder barrels inside the crank case The gate change, on the right, could be tiresome. The lever ” picked up ” two short spring-loaded levers to select one of the three forward. or reverse, gears and it was possible for odd things to happen to these levers when One found oneself in gear with the lever in neutral; work with a screwdriver would correct this. The last bother I had was when the prop. splines wore themselves finally away just outside Taunton. The car was towed back to the town and after many weeks a spire was located. By that time I had obtained a Ii’ o-seater Hillman 10 and I disposed of the Belsize. She shortly deposited the new owner on the wrong side of a hedge when the steering gear failed, without damage to the owner as far as I remember.

All in all she gave me a lot of fun, and the same can be said of the other 30 or 40 ears I have owned in my motoring days, which started in 1924 officially with a driving licence, though I had driven and ridden well before that date. I now have a most satisfactory car, ” one of those ears of course,” which has done 63,000 miles and still requires no added oil between her regular 1,000 mile samp drains. I think this VW will see me out ! I am, Yours; etc.,

Bath. R. CHAPMAN.

[We have received a long letter from the designer of the Belsizei Bradshaw, which will appear next montli.—-ED.]

* * *

 Sir,

I was interested to see that a former owner is enquiring for news of U.T. 38, an ” Ace of Spades ” Lea-Francis. I have no knowledge of this particular car, but he may be interested to know that at least two ” Aces ” are still running.

I actually know of the fate of four or possibly five of this model— the two previously mentioned in more or legs original trim, my own car, which for many years now has had a ” Brooklands ” 4ED engine, one which crashed (some parts of this, notably the rear axle and gearbox, have been used by Keith Roystcr in his Ulster Replica which has appeared at several recent Vintage meetings), and one which was alleged to lie in a garage in Toweester, complete with spare engine.

I also believe that one of the two 18-h.p. cars made in about 1935 still exist in the Sheffield area. These cars were of almost identical engine design to the ” Ace,” with a slightly larger bore, but with a modified chassis frame. I would he very glad indeed to have the existence of one of these two rare cars confirmed !

There are also two of the twin o.h.e. ” Light Six ” care in existence —one being restored in Northumberland, and the other (much modified) lest beard of in the Dartford area. The first of these has the LES/2 engine, and I would expect to find this also in the Dartford car, about which I know very little. Apart from these two, there is also a ” Light Six ” (also known as the 14/40) in Birmingham, but this has been fitted with a normal 4ED Meadows engine.

If anyone knows of any other six-cylinder ” Leafs ” still running or restorable, I should be most interested to bear from them.

Has anyone -ally knowledge of the existence of any Lea-Francis :earlier than 1923.—there were some 7-h.p. air-cooled flat twins made in 1922, also some 9.8s. Before that, there were a few ears made circa 1920. I should like to hear front anyone who knows anything about these at all ! In closing, I should like to say how much I enjoy MOTOR SPORT every month, in particular the Veteran-Edwardian-Vintage feature. I am, Yours, etc., Ludlow. P. W. PRINGLE,

Registrar, Lea-Francis O.C. 

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