Waving the flag

Browse pages
Current page

1

Current page

2

Current page

3

Current page

4

Current page

5

Current page

6

Current page

7

Current page

8

Current page

9

Current page

10

Current page

11

Current page

12

Current page

13

Current page

14

Current page

15

Current page

16

Current page

17

Current page

18

Current page

19

Current page

20

Current page

21

Current page

22

Current page

23

Current page

24

Current page

25

Current page

26

Current page

27

Current page

28

Current page

29

Current page

30

Current page

31

Current page

32

Current page

33

Current page

34

Current page

35

Current page

36

Current page

37

Current page

38

Current page

39

Current page

40

Current page

41

Current page

42

Current page

43

Current page

44

Current page

45

Current page

46

Current page

47

Current page

48

Current page

49

Current page

50

Current page

51

Current page

52

Current page

53

Current page

54

Current page

55

Current page

56

Current page

57

Current page

58

Current page

59

Current page

60

Current page

61

Current page

62

Current page

63

Current page

64

Current page

65

Current page

66

Current page

67

Current page

68

Current page

69

Current page

70

Current page

71

Current page

72

Current page

73

Current page

74

Current page

75

Current page

76

Current page

77

Current page

78

Current page

79

Current page

80

Current page

81

Current page

82

Current page

83

Current page

84

Current page

85

Current page

86

Current page

87

Current page

88

Current page

89

Current page

90

Current page

91

Current page

92

Current page

93

Current page

94

Current page

95

Sir,

Some friends were discussing with me the book “Coleman’s Drive,” which describes how a 1925 Austin Seven in 1959 duplicated “Tschiffely’s Ride” from Buenos Aires to New York— just another phenomenal feat for these unique vehicles.

During our conversation it was explained that last summer a 1929 Austin Seven (UX 5333), a yellow and black tourer rejoicing in the name “Finfinella,” was seen in Monte Carlo, battling up the Zella Pass and finally in Innsbruck. Apparently, it was crewed by three schoolboys from Stockport Grammar School and piled high with sundry equipment, and they were evidently camping. When asked about the trip these young men said: “Trouble-free up to now; she got us here and she’ll get us home.” Was that the opinion of youth or did the gallant old girl keep faith with them?

If they did manage it, they probably hold a composite record for 1962 involving the oldest car with the youngest crew, going farthest through most countries on the smallest b.h.p., with complete confidence and, I hope, still unsullied reliability.

If I were responsible for Austin car exports to the U.S.A., I would endeavour to prevail upon these youngsters to make a further journey say from New York to San Francisco and letting “Pinfinella” rest in Austin showrooms en route. Then maybe the Americans, like the Italians, will be able to chorus “Bella, Bella, Finfinella,” as they did at the top of the Zella.

I say “Bella,” indeed.

Leslie Gronnow.
Scawthorpe