Indy Split book review: War, what is it good for?

A new book on the battle between CART and IRL is dramatic, comical and, says Simon Arron, surprisingly entertaining

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For contextual reasons, a little background is perhaps required before we examine the latest book from one of America’s foremost motor racing analysts, and occasional Motor Sport contributor John Oreovicz.

I must admit to having almost zero interest in politics. In the UK, this is partly because Westminster seems to have become a toxic playground for the terminally incapable – but even before then I found it hard to get excited about some of those involved. And it’s the same when power struggles break out in the parochial business of motor racing. At the heart of the FISA/FOCA conflict in the early 1980s, I’d read a couple of paragraphs in the specialist weeklies to see who was patronising whom, and why, then despair: “Please stop bickering; just get on with the bloody racing…”

Tony George, founder of the Indy Racing League and a chief protagonist in the split

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