A New Trainer.

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68

A New Trainer. The D.W.2 with Cirrus Mark III. Engine.

ADISTINCT breakaway from the conventional is represented in the D.W.2., a new light two

seater biplane constructed by the D.W. Aircraft Co. of Wey’bridge, Surrey. Primarily evolved as a training machine it has been designed by Captain K. N. Pearson, M.C., A.F.R.Ae.S., to the ideas of Captain Neville Stack.

The qualities which have been aimed at in the D.W.2 are a quick take-off combined with a high degree of manceuvreability in the air and a really low landing speed, features which are essential to an aeroplane used principally for training purposes. This has called for a low wing loading and the first thing that strikes one on inspecting this new machine is the rather exceptional span of the main plane which is 38 feet. It is also unusual in having a Warren girder system of interplane bracing, which is not often seen in this country although popular in the U.S.A. The advantage of this arrangement is obvious in that no truing up is necessary as with a wire-braced biplane, and as the machine has folding wings the use

of jury struts when the wings are folded back is obviated. The wings are of wood with an orthodox system of construction, the spars being spindled spruce with wire cross bracing and ply and spruce form and compression ribs. The fuselage is also of wood and is built up in semi-monocoque fashion with spruce longerons and struts, stiffened with three-ply gussets and covered mainly with ply wood. The frontal area of the fuselage is small even for a light plane, but, on sitting in the machine one found that this has not been acquired at the expense of general roominess of the cockpits which are quite snug and free from incorporation of hinged decking round the top making for ease of entry and exit. Dual control, of course, is fitted,

draughts. The two cockpits are unusually close together and one was interested to discover that conversation could be carried on between pilot and passenger with very little difficulty without the use of speaking tubes.

Another good point is that, owing to the position of the C. of G., the machine can be flown solo from the front seat without the use of ballast. The cutting away of the trailing edge of the centre section and the lower wing roots gives a visibility both above and below which is very good. The chord of the top plane is 6 feet and that of the bottom is 4 feet 9 inches and ailerons are fitted only to the top planes. The empennage is of the usual type and the rudder is partially balanced and blends well with the general outline of the fin. The tailplane is braced above and below with streamlined wires. The engine fitted to the D.W.2, is a Cirrus Mark III. and the whole unit has been carefully cowled so as to minimise drag to the utmost, and the appearance of the nose is very neat. The petrol tank is situated in

the centre section, feed to the carburettor, being of course, by gravity. The undercarriage, which is of the axleless type, has the exceptionally wide track of 7 feet. The shock absorbing units consist of rubber rings in compression, enclosed in metal sleeves, and the tail skid, which is fixed, is damped by rubber rings in tension. A feature of the D.W.2 which is not found on a good many light planes is that access to both the front and back cockpits does not call for any awkward contortions on the part of the occupant, the and the stick, rudderbar and engine controls are placed so as to give a very comfortable position. At the moment of writing, the D.W.2 is passing through its preliminary tests and so far it has shown up extremely well ; it has no peculiar vices and one highly desirable quality is that it refuses to spin even when corapletely stalled a n d recovers flying speed in a remarkably short time. Its top speed is in the neighbourhood of m. p. h., and its landing speed is about 30 m.p.h., and though it is a very safe and comfortable machine to fly, it is quite capa

ble of being stunted. Altogether the D.W.2 appears to be not only an excellent machine for training purposes but equally so as a private owners’ plane.

The following are the dimensions and principle data of the D.W.2.

Coincident with the production of this interesting craft, the D.W. Aircraft Co is, undergoing re-organisation and they have removed to an aerodrome at Ford, near Bognor Regis. It is the intention of Mr. Dudley Watt, principal of the Company to establish a school there and training will be carried out exclusively with, D. W.2’s as soon as they have ve been built in. sufficient numbers ; in the meantime, training is being carried on with Moths. There will be a staff of some five instructors under the leadership of F.10. W. A. R o llason,

and the standard of training will be of a very high order. In addition to flying instruction, the Company has made plans to undertake aero repairs and overhauls of every description, and as they have two large permanent hangars they can offer visiting pilots excellent accommodation for machines.

Another branch of their business will be joy-riding and for this purpose they will have several Avro 504’s in commission at numerous holiday resorts during the coming months. It is also understood that a gliding club may make Ford Aerodrome its headquarters so that it seems likely that the D.W. Company’s new home may shortly become one of the busiest and most interesting aviation centres in the country.

G. G. O. M.

A FLYING BRANCH FOR B.A.R.C.

ASCHEME has been lately drawn up by the Brooklands Automobile Racing Club for the formation of an associated flying club through which members will have the use of machines at a low rate of hire. Membership with these flying facilities will be confined to people with ” A ” or ” B ” licenses only and it is stipulated that pilots, when joining, shall undergo an examination flight with an • instructor from the Brooklands School of Flying. A new metal, H.P.slotted ” Moth ” has already been acquired for the club, and this will be available for solo flying at £2 per hour. In addition to flying membership, admission will be open to associate members who will be allowed full use of B.A.R.C. premises, the aerodrome clubhouse and bar ; this membership is for the convenience of

those who are in the habit of visiting the track by air, and it should be noted that there will be no landing fee. The annual subscriptions will be as follow :

For existing B.A.R.C. members—al Is. no entrance fee. Full membership with flying facilities—Subscription £6 6s., entrance fee £5 5s., or subscription £7 7s., and no entrance fee. Flying members—Subscription. 24 4s., entrance fee £3 3s. Associate members 21 is., entrance fee 5s. Subscriptions will date from January to December.

All those interested in the project are invited to communicate with Mr. A. Percy Bradley, the Clerk of the Course, in the first place, and if sufficient support is forthcoming the Club will immediately commence operations with Mr. C. S. Burney as secretary.